Hall (1984). Different Streams. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“I soon learned that I was dealing with at least four different time systems: Hopi time, Navajo time, government bureaucratic time, and the time used by the other white men (mostly Indian traders) who lived on the reservation. There was also Eastern tourist time, banker’s time (when notes were due), and many other variations of the white man’s time system.” (p 29)

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Mitchell, Guichon, & Wong (2015). Caring for children, focusing on children.

“A more recent report claims that ‘Racism against Indigenous peoples in the healthcare system is so pervasive that people strategize around anticipated racism before visiting the emergency department or, in some cases, avoid care altogether’ (13).” (p 294)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). What to Build Upon: Sociocultural Strengths. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The concept is further complicated because, in addition to living beings, it includes life force entities such as toboggans, spears, cars, record players, and so on. These latter entities are considered forms of life, not inanimate objects or things.” (p 56)

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Wilson (2008). On the Research Journey. (Research is ceremony: Indigenous research methods.)

“… four dominant paradigms … there is a common thread of thinking that runs through them. This commonality is that knowledge is seen as being _individual_ in nature. This is vastly different from the Indigenous paradigm, where knowledge is seen as belonging to the cosmos of which we are a part and where researchers are only the interpreters of this knowledge. This distinction in the ownership of knowledge is one major difference between the dominant and Indigenous paradigms …” (p 38)

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Yosso (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth.

“… his [Bourdieu] theory of cultural capital has been used to assert that some communities are culturally wealthy while others are culturally poor. … In other words, cultural capital is not just inherited or possessed by the middle class, but rather it refers to an accumulation of specific forms of knowledge, skills and abilities that are _valued_ by privileged groups in society.” (p 76)

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Molnar (2012). Responsibility as the Welcoming of Difference: Thoughts on Levinas and a Teacher’s Experience.

“There are powerful arguments that exist in advocating for educators’ involvement in anti-racist and social justice undertakings, yet at the core of these exists how responsibility is understood and enacted in face-to-face interactions.” (p 46)

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Schick (2014). White resentment in settler society.

“… having diversity policies in official documents means that you don’t actually have to carry out the diversity. Knowing enough to put in the policy is an example of white racial knowledge. Doing nothing about it is another.” (p 100)

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