Said (1994). Chapter 1 – Overlapping Territories, Intertwined Histories. (Culture and Imperialism.)

“The wonder of it is that the schooling for such relatively provincial thought and action is still prevalent, unchecked, uncritically accepted, recurringly replicated in the education of generation after generation. We are all taught to venerate our nations and admire our traditions: we are taught to pursue their interests with toughness and in disregard for other societies. A new and in my opinion appalling tribalism is fracturing societies, separating peoples, promoting greed, bloody conflict, and uninteresting assertions of minor ethnic or group particularity.” (p 20)

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Mander (1991). The Importance Of The Negative View. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“Meanwhile, industry, the media, and the government were all repeating the mantra that technology serves progress and that progress equals more technology.” (p 39)

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Franklin (2004). Coda (The Real World Of Technology).

“One precondition for pressing for systemic changes is an understanding of the ongoing dynamics of technology and power. … For instance, over the unending din of economic rhetoric, we need to speak of what happens to people.” (p 177)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 10 (The Real World Of Technology).

“While the pool of information available to the students may increase, the pool of available understanding may not. This has considerable consequences for social [page break] cohesion and peace and deserves careful attention.” (p 171-172)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 7 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… we are not dealing here merely with recasting an old task — that of sending and receiving messages — into a new technological setting. We have to deal with different and quite new social relationships that now superimpose existing ones.” (p 144)

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Snyder (2017). On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.

“You submit to tyranny when you renounce the difference between what you want to hear and what is actually the case. This renunciation of reality can feel natural and pleasant, but the result is your demise as an individual — and thus the collapse of any political system that depends upon individualism.”

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 6 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… if somebody robs a store, it’s a crime and the state is all set and ready to nab the criminal. But if somebody steals from the commons and from the future, it’s seen as entrepreneurial activity and the state cheers and gives them tax concessions rather than arresting them.” (p 123)

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Merton (1964). Foreword. (The Technological Society.)

“Ours is a progressively technical civilization: by this Ellul means that the ever-expanding and irreversible rule of technique is extended to all domains of life. It is a civilization committed to the quest for continually improved means to carelessly examined ends.” (p vi)

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