Franklin (2004). Chapter 4 (The Real World Of Technology).

“Many technological systems, when examined for context and overall design, are basically anti-people. … When students are seen as not sufficiently competent, it is likely to be computers that the school purchases rather than extra teacher’s time and extra human help. And when security agencies in this country feel that Canadian citizens harbour thoughts and might contemplate actions that the state doesn’t like, they don’t invite these citizens to discuss their grievances or alternate thoughts openly and on a basis of equality. Instead, telephones are tapped or files are assembled by purely technological means.” (p 71-72)

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Clarke (2017). Grounding care practices in theory: Exploring the potential for the ethics of care to provide theoretical justification for patient-centered care.

“… the families’ supporters argue for the importance of valuing traditional healing practices as fundamental cultural values that ought to be preserved and respected no matter what Western medicine might favour or predict.” (p 69)

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Kemper (2016). Cultural Hybridity, Resilience and the Communication of Contemporary Cherokee Culture through Mobile Technologies. (Indigenous People and Mobile Technologies.)

“Since adaptability is inevitable, the original culture makes the best of things, as we will see in the example of the Cherokee and mobile technologies.” (p 243)

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Hall (1984). Appendix II – Japanese and American Contrasts, with Special Reference to the MA. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“The closest one can come to understanding Japanese time is to approach via the route of MA. MA is time-space. … in the West we pay particular attention to the arrangement of objects, and in Japan it is the arrangement of the spaces — the intervals, MA — that are attended. In speech this means that it is the silences between words that also carry meaning and are significant.” (p 208)

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Hall (1984). God is in the Details. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“According to Fuentes, our denial of the past has led to the degradation of morality and the denial of the lessons of the past. Denial of the rights as well as the reality of other cultures is another of the consequences of Western time concepts.” (p 201-202)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Ininee mamitoneneetumowin, Indigenous Thinking: Emerging Theory of Indigenous Education. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“However, one of the contradictions of schooling is while it can be an institution of colonization, it also has the potential to decolonize (Smith 2000) and support the development of self-determination for Indigenous students and their communities.” (p 200)

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Hall (1984). The East and The West. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“M. Matsumoto, the Japanese author, interpreter, and translator, states that the Japanese act from three centers: mind, heart, and hara (‘gut’ or ‘belly’). Because of the highly situational character of Japanese culture, it is important to know which of these three may dominate a given situation. Mind is for business, heart is for home and friends, while hara is what one strives for in all things. … The heart you can depend on; the mind is always changing. It takes hara to integrate the two.” (p 102)

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Russell (2009). The Functions Of A Teacher. (Unpopular Essays.)

“In our more highly organised world we face a new problem. Something called education is given to everybody, usually by the State, but sometimes by the Churches. The teacher has thus become, in the vast majority of cases, a civil servant obliged to carry out the behests of men who have not his learning, who have no experience of dealing with the young, and whose only attitude towards education is that of the propagandist.” (p 110)

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Justice (2016). “Go Away Water!” Kinship Criticism and the Decolonization Imperative.

“Kinship is adaptive; race, as a threatened constitutive commodity, always runs the risk of becoming washed out to the point of insignificance. … race-reading — rooted as it is in Eurowestern stereotypes and deficiency definitions — can only view Indians through a lens of eventual Indian erasure.” (p 362)

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