The Story of the “Dead Line” (1912)

“The Inspector, who was later Chief of Police, established his imaginary dead line at Fulton street, and forbade any crook to show his face below that point. … And for fifteen years, from 1880 to 1895, when Inspector Byrnes was in charge of the Wall Street bureau for the prevention of crime in the financial district, the crooks gave that part of the city below Fulton street wide berth.”

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Levinson (2005). Survival of the Media Fit. (“The Soft Edge”, Chapter 9)

“The technological stage was set for motion photography to be more than a photocopy of life in action: scenes that followed one another in the real world could now be separated on film; scenes that had no connection in the real world could be brought together in the motion [page break] picture; and all at the behest of the filmmaker’s inner vision, via the expedient of a splice.” (p 96-97)

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Wells (2015). “Why[,] These Children Are Not Really Indians”: Race, Time, and Indian Authenticity.

“What missionaries viewed as Natives abandoning the regulation of the missions was, in reality, Natives privileging and adhering to older temporal signals dictated by nature. Native Americans did not lack a sense of time, as missionaries argued, but rather selected which temporal cues to follow.” (p 10)

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Adam (1994). Perceptions of Time.

“… no society has completely replaced the multiplicity of social time with the singularity of clock time. In other words, there exists no society for which machine time constitutes the only source of social time. This effectively disqualifies dichotomous constructions from anthropological analyses of culturally specific times.” (p 516)

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