Borges (1964). A New Refutation of Time. (Labyrinths: Selected Stories & Other Writings).

“It is not indivisible, for in such a case it would have no beginning to link it to the past nor end to link it to the future, nor even a middle, since what has no beginning or end can have no middle; neither is it divisible, for in such a case it would consist of a part that was and another that is not. _Ergo_, it does not exist, but since the past and the future do not exist either, time does not exist. … time is a mere relation between intemporal things.” (p 232)

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Crosby (1997). Time. (The Measure of Reality.)

“For generations the town clock was the one complicated machine that hundreds of thousands saw every day, heard over and over again every day and night. It taught them that invisible, inaudible, seamless time was composed of quanta. It, like money, taught them quantification.” (p 85)

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Mander (1991). Seven Negative Points About Computers. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“The real issue is not whether computers can benefit you or your group; the question is who benefits most from the existence of computers in society? The answer suggests that, for all of their small-scale benefits, the largest institutions have far more to gain, and they know it.” (p 68)

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Franklin (2004). Coda (The Real World Of Technology).

“One precondition for pressing for systemic changes is an understanding of the ongoing dynamics of technology and power. … For instance, over the unending din of economic rhetoric, we need to speak of what happens to people.” (p 177)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 10 (The Real World Of Technology).

“While the pool of information available to the students may increase, the pool of available understanding may not. This has considerable consequences for social [page break] cohesion and peace and deserves careful attention.” (p 171-172)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 8 (The Real World Of Technology).

“It is well to remember that Immanuel Kant saw time and space not as external media within which people move, but as ordering devices of the human mind.” (p 149)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 7 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… we are not dealing here merely with recasting an old task — that of sending and receiving messages — into a new technological setting. We have to deal with different and quite new social relationships that now superimpose existing ones.” (p 144)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 6 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… if somebody robs a store, it’s a crime and the state is all set and ready to nab the criminal. But if somebody steals from the commons and from the future, it’s seen as entrepreneurial activity and the state cheers and gives them tax concessions rather than arresting them.” (p 123)

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