Harris (2014). Chapter 1: Spirituality. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion).

“Our minds are all we have. They are all we have ever had. And they are all we can offer others. … Every experience you have ever had has been shaped by your mind. Every relationship is as good or as bad as it is because of the minds involved.” (¶5)

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Schirmer, Meck, & Penney (2016). The Socio-Temporal Brain: Connecting People in Time.

“Neuroimaging research has revealed brain regions that are preferentially engaged in social processing. These regions, collectively referred to as the ‘social brain’ [50], activate more strongly when individuals perceive information from or about other people than when they perceive non-human objects. For example, faces, voices, body movements, and human-like touch have all been shown to specifically stimulate the ‘social brain’ [51–53].” (p 765)

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Patton, M. A. (2000). The Importance of Being Flexible with Assignment Deadlines.

“This article suggests ways in which course providers, by circumventing traditional academic policies and showing maximum flexibility and understanding to non-traditional students, can bring high-risk students long-term positive results …” (p 417)

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Borges (1964). A New Refutation of Time. (Labyrinths: Selected Stories & Other Writings).

“It is not indivisible, for in such a case it would have no beginning to link it to the past nor end to link it to the future, nor even a middle, since what has no beginning or end can have no middle; neither is it divisible, for in such a case it would consist of a part that was and another that is not. _Ergo_, it does not exist, but since the past and the future do not exist either, time does not exist. … time is a mere relation between intemporal things.” (p 232)

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Crosby (1997). Time. (The Measure of Reality.)

“For generations the town clock was the one complicated machine that hundreds of thousands saw every day, heard over and over again every day and night. It taught them that invisible, inaudible, seamless time was composed of quanta. It, like money, taught them quantification.” (p 85)

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Mander (1991). Seven Negative Points About Computers. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“The real issue is not whether computers can benefit you or your group; the question is who benefits most from the existence of computers in society? The answer suggests that, for all of their small-scale benefits, the largest institutions have far more to gain, and they know it.” (p 68)

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Franklin (2004). Coda (The Real World Of Technology).

“One precondition for pressing for systemic changes is an understanding of the ongoing dynamics of technology and power. … For instance, over the unending din of economic rhetoric, we need to speak of what happens to people.” (p 177)

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