Dainton (2017). Temporal Consciousness. (The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.)

“… there are many who have denied that time really _does_ pass. Of these a few share McTaggart’s view that time cannot pass because time does not exist. A more popular view, these days at least, is the view that while time certainly exists, it is more akin to space than it superficially seems. … Time _per se_ may not pass or flow, but there is undeniably something akin to passage and flow in our immediate experience, and this _phenomenal_ passage does not require _physical_ passage, it can exist a four-dimensional Block universe.” (¶270)

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Feenberg (2017). Critical theory of technology and STS.

“The dominant program is materialized in actual technologies through designed-in values and purposes. The dominant actors thus always have the ‘facts’ on their side. The anti-program may be confined at first to discursive expressions such as protests and demands articulating values different from those of the dominant actors. The subordinate actors’ demands usually appear to be unrealistic, ideological, in the face of the ‘facts’.” (p 6)

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Harris (2014). Chapter 1: Spirituality. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion).

“Our minds are all we have. They are all we have ever had. And they are all we can offer others. … Every experience you have ever had has been shaped by your mind. Every relationship is as good or as bad as it is because of the minds involved.” (¶5)

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Schirmer, Meck, & Penney (2016). The Socio-Temporal Brain: Connecting People in Time.

“Neuroimaging research has revealed brain regions that are preferentially engaged in social processing. These regions, collectively referred to as the ‘social brain’ [50], activate more strongly when individuals perceive information from or about other people than when they perceive non-human objects. For example, faces, voices, body movements, and human-like touch have all been shown to specifically stimulate the ‘social brain’ [51–53].” (p 765)

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Patton, M. A. (2000). The Importance of Being Flexible with Assignment Deadlines.

“This article suggests ways in which course providers, by circumventing traditional academic policies and showing maximum flexibility and understanding to non-traditional students, can bring high-risk students long-term positive results …” (p 417)

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Borges (1964). A New Refutation of Time. (Labyrinths: Selected Stories & Other Writings).

“It is not indivisible, for in such a case it would have no beginning to link it to the past nor end to link it to the future, nor even a middle, since what has no beginning or end can have no middle; neither is it divisible, for in such a case it would consist of a part that was and another that is not. _Ergo_, it does not exist, but since the past and the future do not exist either, time does not exist. … time is a mere relation between intemporal things.” (p 232)

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Crosby (1997). Time. (The Measure of Reality.)

“For generations the town clock was the one complicated machine that hundreds of thousands saw every day, heard over and over again every day and night. It taught them that invisible, inaudible, seamless time was composed of quanta. It, like money, taught them quantification.” (p 85)

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