Ong (2002). The orality of language. (Orality and Literacy: The Technologizing of the Word.)

“‘Reading’ a text means converting it to sound, aloud or in the imagination, syllable-by- syllable …. we can style writing a ‘secondary modeling system’, dependent on a prior primary system, spoken language.” (p 8)

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Marcuse (1991). The New Forms of Control. (One-Dimensional Man.)

“The people recognize themselves in their commodities; they find their soul in their automobile, hi-fi set, split-level home, kitchen equipment. The very mechanism which ties the individual to his society has changed, and social control is anchored in the new needs which it has produced.” (p 11)

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Kellner (1991). Introduction to the Second Edition. (One-Dimensional Man.)

“The book contains a theory of ‘advanced industrial society’ that describes how changes in production, consumption, culture, and thought have produced an advanced state of conformity in which the production of needs and aspirations by the prevailing societal apparatus integrates individuals into the established societies. Marcuse describes what has become known as the ‘technological society,’ in which technology restructures labor and leisure, influencing life from the organization of labor to modes of thought. He also describes the mechanisms through which consumer capitalism integrates individuals into its world of thought and behavior.” (p xii)

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Burbules (2016). Technology, Education, and the Fetishization of the ‘New.’

“New technologies are neither the key to solving education’s problems, nor a blight that will make those problems worse. How do we think about the potential, and the limitations, of technologies in education without getting caught up in the fetishization of the new?” (p 14)

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