Goulet & Goulet (2014). How to Get There: Conceptualizing Effective Teaching. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The principles of effective teaching for Indigenous students apply to all students, but Indigenous education has unique features based on the history, culture, and philosophies of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples, who tend to view the world in a more holistic way than the European framework that is the basis of our education system in Canada.” (p 78)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). What to Build Upon: Sociocultural Strengths. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The concept is further complicated because, in addition to living beings, it includes life force entities such as toboggans, spears, cars, record players, and so on. These latter entities are considered forms of life, not inanimate objects or things.” (p 56)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Where We’ve Been: Sociohistorical Realities. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The hierarchical structure of education continues to the present with the norms of unequal power relations and competitive individualism that can result in inequities.” (p 44)

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Molnar (2012). Responsibility as the Welcoming of Difference: Thoughts on Levinas and a Teacher’s Experience.

“There are powerful arguments that exist in advocating for educators’ involvement in anti-racist and social justice undertakings, yet at the core of these exists how responsibility is understood and enacted in face-to-face interactions.” (p 46)

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Delpit & Dowdy (2002). No Kinda Sense.

“When instruction is stripped of children’s cultural legacies, then they are forced to believe that the world and all the good things in it were created by others. This leaves students further alienated from the school and its instructional goals, and more likely to view themselves as inadequate.” (p 41)

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Kinasevych (2016). Time To Learn: Doing Away With Deadlines In Post-Secondary Education.

The assessment of learning was merged with time limits, “a compromise for the sake of administrative efficiency” (Wesman, 1949, p. 51). Deadline performance became a proxy for actual learning, thereby diminishing learner autonomy, motivation, and creativity (Deci & Ryan, 2012).

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Kanu (2002). In Their Own Voices: First Nations Students Identify Some Cultural Mediators of Their Learning in the Formal School System.

“It appears that although oral instructional methods such as storytelling are an important cultural approach to learning for these students, the verbal saturation that characterizes much of school instruction, especially when this instruction is fast-paced and delivered in a different language, is not conducive to academic success for them.” (p 108)

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