Selwyn (2016). Minding our language: why education and technology is full of bullshit… and what might be done about it.

“Perhaps, we need a language of education and technology that unpacks more aptly the underlying functions of these technologies and exposes their political intent.” (p 441-442)

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Aagaard (2017). Breaking down barriers: The ambivalent nature of technologies in the classroom.

“Combined, these discourses lead us to _the paradox of educational technology_: When something good happens, we praise technology; but when something bad happens, we blame the students (occasionally, this blame also extends to their teachers).” (p 1129)

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United Nations Economic and Social Council. (2018). Action plan for organizing the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages.

“Indigenous languages also represent complex systems of knowledge developed and accumulated over thousands of years. Local languages are indeed a kind of cultural treasure; they are repositories of diversity and key resources for both understanding the environment and utilizing it to the best advantage of local populations, as well as of humanity as a whole. They foster and promote local cultural specificities, customs and values which have endured for thousands of years.” (p 2-3)

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Patton, M. A. (2000). The Importance of Being Flexible with Assignment Deadlines.

“This article suggests ways in which course providers, by circumventing traditional academic policies and showing maximum flexibility and understanding to non-traditional students, can bring high-risk students long-term positive results …” (p 417)

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Gomez-Zuebisch (2010). Introduction. (A phenomenological exploration of the learning values derived from instructional short videos among adult learners.)

“To this resistance, Mitra responded with a quote from the science fiction writer Sir Arthur C. Clarke who stated ‘A teacher that can be replaced by a machine should be’.” (p 27)

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Chambers (2015). Language Nests as an Emergent Global Phenomenon.

“This literature review demonstrates that approaches to language nest program development and delivery are shaped by many factors such as: Indigenous language status within the community, population size, availability of fluent speakers and early childhood educators, state legislation and funding, and access to materials and resources in the target language.” (p 26)

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Everett-Green (2015). How my neighbourhood looks and sounds in Ojibway.

“In another Spreecast, about learning indigenous languages, Coast Salish teacher Khelsilem Rivers, founder of the Skwomesh Language Academy in Squamish, B.C., said he isn’t interested in language apps, CD-ROMs or anything that involves working from English translations. Fluency is impossible with ‘that English brain controlling things.’ Full immersion is the only way, he said…” (¶21)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Breaking Trail: Stories Outside the (Classroom) Box. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Many students have reported that ‘traditional life’ in the wilderness brings a feeling of serenity and peace to one’s heart and spirit” (p 186)

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Hall (1984). The Dance of Life. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“One clue is that the Japanese are more aware of synchrony than the average Westerner. Those tremendous Sumo wrestlers, for example, must synchronize their breathing before the referee will allow the match to begin, and the audience is fully aware of what is happening. In this same vein, Japanese who are conversing will frequently monitor their own breathing in order to stay in sync with their interlocutor!” (p 164)

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