Swoyer (2003). The Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis.

“But what is easy to say in one language may be harder to say in a second, and this may make it easier or more natural or more common for speakers of the first language to think in a certain way than for speakers of the second language to do so. A concept or category may be more available in some linguistic communities than in others.” (¶ 39)

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Hale (1998). On endangered languages and the importance of linguistic diversity.

“The fact is, an enormous body of cultural and intellectual wealth was lost irretrievably in the course of the European colonization of the New World and the South. It was lost utterly and without being noticed, primarily because it was mental wealth, appreciable only through the language which was lost with it.” (p 193)

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Hall (1984). Experiencing Time. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“This principle is illustrated by the way in which we have taken our own biological clocks, moved them outside ourselves, and then treated the extensions as though they represented the only reality. … Because of extension transference, the schedule is the reality and people and their needs are not considered.” (p 131)

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Hall (1984). The East and The West. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“M. Matsumoto, the Japanese author, interpreter, and translator, states that the Japanese act from three centers: mind, heart, and hara (‘gut’ or ‘belly’). Because of the highly situational character of Japanese culture, it is important to know which of these three may dominate a given situation. Mind is for business, heart is for home and friends, while hara is what one strives for in all things. … The heart you can depend on; the mind is always changing. It takes hara to integrate the two.” (p 102)

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Lucy (2015). Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis. (International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences.)

“The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, also known as the linguistic relativity hypothesis, refers to the proposal that the particular language one speaks influences the way one thinks about reality.” (p 903)

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Hall (1984). Culture’s Clocks: Nuer, Tiv, and Quiché Time. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“Words, after all, are symbols, and while it is the symbols that are used to describe what the people do, somehow in this process the symbols and the story they tell take on a life of their own.” (p 83)

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Hall (1984). Different Streams. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“I soon learned that I was dealing with at least four different time systems: Hopi time, Navajo time, government bureaucratic time, and the time used by the other white men (mostly Indian traders) who lived on the reservation. There was also Eastern tourist time, banker’s time (when notes were due), and many other variations of the white man’s time system.” (p 29)

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Vowel (2016). The Terminology of Relationships. (Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit issues in Canada)

“I mean, it would be a bit off to deliberately keep calling someone ‘Susie’ when she’s asked you to call her ‘Susan,’ right?” (p 8)

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Stoicheff & Taylor (2004). Introduction: Architectures, Ideologies, and Materials of the Page.

“… from about the year 1000 on, scholastic or analytic reading increasingly replaced the older, slower, subvocalizing rumination of monastic reading, transforming the page ‘from a score for pious mumblers into an optically organized text for logical thinkers.'” (p 11)

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