Stoicheff & Taylor (2004). Introduction: Architectures, Ideologies, and Materials of the Page.

“… from about the year 1000 on, scholastic or analytic reading increasingly replaced the older, slower, subvocalizing rumination of monastic reading, transforming the page ‘from a score for pious mumblers into an optically organized text for logical thinkers.'” (p 11)

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Vygotsky (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes.

“It may be said that the basic characteristic of human behavior in general is that humans personally influence their relations with the environment and through that environment personally change their behavior, subjugating it to their control.” (p 51)

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Glick (1975). Cognitive development in cross-cultural perspective.

“For example, in the sorting task, twenty items representing five types of food, five types of clothing, and five types of cooking utensils were heaped on a table in front of a Kpelle subject. When the subject had finished sorting, what was present were ten categories composed of two items each — related to each other in a functional, not categorical, manner. Thus, a knife might have been placed with an orange, a potato with a hoe, and so on. When asked, the subject would rationalize the choice with such comments as, ‘The knife goes with the orange because it cuts it.'”

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