Snyder (2017). On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.

“You submit to tyranny when you renounce the difference between what you want to hear and what is actually the case. This renunciation of reality can feel natural and pleasant, but the result is your demise as an individual — and thus the collapse of any political system that depends upon individualism.”

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 4 (The Real World Of Technology).

“Many technological systems, when examined for context and overall design, are basically anti-people. … When students are seen as not sufficiently competent, it is likely to be computers that the school purchases rather than extra teacher’s time and extra human help. And when security agencies in this country feel that Canadian citizens harbour thoughts and might contemplate actions that the state doesn’t like, they don’t invite these citizens to discuss their grievances or alternate thoughts openly and on a basis of equality. Instead, telephones are tapped or files are assembled by purely technological means.” (p 71-72)

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Canadian Press. (2018). Can U.S. border guards search your phone? Yes, and here are some details on how.

“Agents can demand a password to open your phone, without probable cause, Nielsen confirmed during the hearing. However, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) staff attorney Sophia Cope says the directive, which she calls confusing, also allows you to refuse to do so. That, of course, is not without its consequences she says in a statement to CBC News. Your device could be seized or detained. The border agent could delay your travel or even deny entry if you are not a U.S. citizen.” (¶ 9)

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Bohaker & Dirks (2015). Privacy Impact Assessments and Microsoft & Google Vendor Contracts: Examining Canadian University eCommunications Outsourcing decisions.

“To give just one representative example, here is the short explanation given on the University of Manitoba’s ‘Frequently Asked Questions page about their Office 365 email deployment. The question: ‘is my email subject to US government laws? The answer: ‘Yes. However, the move to Office 365 results in no appreciable difference to what currently exists with our email. US and Canadian laws regarding email are very similar in nature.63. In making such claims, we noticed that the authors of PIAs and University ‘FAQ’ documents were drawing on conclusions also reached by some privacy commissioners and asserted by some privacy experts and product vendors. As we have found in our research, this argument is deeply flawed.64 Canadian jurisdiction offers significantly better privacy protection to Canadians and residents than US jurisdiction does, for example.” (p 19)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 1 (The Real World Of Technology.)

“It is my conviction that nothing short of a global reformation of major social forces and of the social contract can end this historical period of profound and violent transformations, and give a manner of security to the world and to its citizens. … The viability of technology, like democracy, depends in the end on the practice of justice and on the enforcement of limits to power.” (p 5)

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Lanchester (2017). You Are the Product.

“In the open air, fake news can be debated and exposed; on Facebook, if you aren’t a member of the community being served the lies, you’re quite likely never to know that they are in circulation. It’s crucial to this that Facebook has no financial interest in telling the truth. No company better exemplifies the internet-age dictum that if the product is free, you are the product. … If your only interest is in connecting people, why would you care about falsehoods? They might even be better than the truth, since they are quicker to identify the like-minded.” (¶14)

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Bennett (2008). The Strategies.

“For the privacy advocate, the politics of information is more difficult. It relies upon argumentation about potential consequences. It often involves extrapolations from the experiences of similar surveillance systems in other times and places. Increasingly it involves considerable technical expertise, and sophisticated understandings of the operation of complex public and private organizations.” (p 98)

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Cadwalladr (2017). The great British Brexit robbery: How our democracy was hijacked.

“And it was Facebook that made it possible. It was from Facebook that Cambridge Analytica obtained its vast dataset in the first place. Earlier, psychologists at Cambridge University harvested Facebook data (legally) for research purposes and published pioneering peer-reviewed work about determining personality traits, political partisanship, sexuality and much more from people’s Facebook ‘likes’.” (¶41)

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