Simon (2018). Delete Your Account Now: A Conversation with Jaron Lanier.

“They are these other people who decide, called advertisers — or I prefer to call them manipulators, because they have been sold on the idea that they’re not just advertising. They’re not just getting a message in front of you, but are part of a mathematical scheme that will predictably addict you and then modify your behavior.” (ΒΆ10)

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Mander (1991). Seven Negative Points About Computers. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“The real issue is not whether computers can benefit you or your group; the question is who benefits most from the existence of computers in society? The answer suggests that, for all of their small-scale benefits, the largest institutions have far more to gain, and they know it.” (p 68)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 7 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… we are not dealing here merely with recasting an old task — that of sending and receiving messages — into a new technological setting. We have to deal with different and quite new social relationships that now superimpose existing ones.” (p 144)

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Morris (2016). An Example of Excellence: Chickasaw Language Revitalization through Technology.

“Indeed, through this article, in the Western academic sense, we see technology, adaption and adoption, synthesis and innovation by the Chickasaw Nation. But those from Native communities, including this author, see self-determination in praxis. Language is a matter of cultural survival.” (p 302)

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Beaton, Burnard, Linden, & O’Donnell (2016). Keewaytinook Mobile: An Indigenous Community-Owned Mobile Phone Service in Northern Canada.

“… OCAP is an Indigenous response to the role of knowledge production in challenging colonial relations. … First, Indigenous communities must retain access and possession of the capacity and resources to effectively manage the content, traffic and services on their local network. Second, Indigenous communities have a right to own and control the local broadband network in their communities in order to support the flow of information and services (Kakekaspan et al. 2014).” (p 111)

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