Ozanne, Moscato & Kunkel (2013). Transformative Photography: Evaluation and Best Practices for Eliciting Social and Policy Changes.

“In 1888, police reporter Jacob Riis used the medium to record New York City’s crime-ridden and impoverished slums. His photographs coalesced public opinion and led to greater enforcement of existing laws and the creation of new building codes and apartment regulations. Sociologist Lewis Hine’s photographs of underage workers helped inspire the first federally sanctioned child labor laws in 1916 (Collier and Collier 1986). … Ordinary citizens use digital photographs to record extraordinary sights, such as the catalytic images disseminated during the ‘Arab Spring’ (Howard and Hussain 2011).” (p 45)

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Kuwayama (2012). The Ainu in the Ethnographic Triad: From the Described to the Describer. (Anthropologists, Indigenous Scholars and the Research Endeavour)

“Generally speaking, non-Western natives have been regarded as objects of thought, rather than partners in scholarly dialogue; … they have therefore been excluded from anthropological, or for that matter, almost any kind of scientific discourse …” (p 46)

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O’Reilly (2012). New directions in ethnography. (Ethnographic Methods)

“Visual images can be analysed in terms of their content — what they say, what they contain, how they appear; as well as their utility — how they are used, where they are displayed …. But they can also be explored in terms of how people talk about them and use them to talk about other things.” (p 165)

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