Petre & Rugg (2010). Presentations. (The Unwritten Rules Of PhD Research.)

“… don’t sacrifice the evidence, otherwise your take-away message won’t be convincing. Don’t short-change the context, otherwise the research choices may not make sense. Don’t forget to motivate the question, otherwise the audience might wonder why you’re bothering.” (p 173)

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Kovach (2010). Epistemology and Research: Centring Tribal Knowledge. (Indigenous Methodologies: Characteristics, Conversations, and Contexts.)

“Daniel Wildcat considers how place informs: ‘You see and hear things by being in a forest, on a river, or at an ocean coastline; you gain real experiential knowledge that you cannot see by looking at the beings that live in those environments under a microscope or in a laboratory experiment’ (in Deloria and Wildcat, 2001: 36).” (p 61)

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Kovach (2010). Creating Indigenous Research Frameworks. (Indigenous Methodologies: Characteristics, Conversations, and Contexts.)

“When Indigenous researchers utilize Indigenous methods, there is always a tribal epistemic positioning in operation. However, this tends to be rendered invisible methodologically, and I believe that part of the problem lies within the conceptual framing.” (p 42)

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Smith (2012). Articulating an Indigenous Research Agenda. (Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples.)

“Although our communities have a critical perspective of universities and what they represent, at the same time these same communities want their members to gain Western educations and high-level qualifications. But they do not want this to be achieved at the cost of destroying people’s indigenous identities, their languages, values and practices.” (p 149)

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Smith (2012). Notes from Down Under. (Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples.)

“In the process of global changes indigenous peoples are socially interested activists rather than passive bystanders. Perhaps it is this positioning that offers greater possibility for the survival of indigenous peoples.” (p 121)

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