Taylor (1983). In defense of biocentrism.

“A rational human being will then take that attitude because it is seen to be the only justified or suitable one to take toward such creatures. The attitude is a uniquely human attitude in the sense that only humans are capable of having it, but it is not an anthropocentric attitude.” (p 241)

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King (1963). Letter From A Birmingham Jail.

“I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to ‘order’ than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: ‘I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action’; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a ‘more convenient season.'” (¶23, p 9-10)

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Sinclair (2017). Indigenous nationhood can save the world. Here’s how.

“In political events we take time as Anishinaabeg to greet everyone and make sure we know where everyone is from, who they represent and how, and how their responsibilities have brought them to this place.” (¶17)

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Vowel (2016). Myth-Busting. (Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit issues in Canada.)

“Every single one of us, Indigenous and non-Indigenous alike, has been fed a series of lies, half-truths, and fantasies intended to create a cohesive national identity. What is most startling about this is that a great many people are aware of the errors and omissions present in our system of education and in our public discourse, yet there has not been a national attempt to rectify this.” (p 120)

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Sinclair (2013). First Thought. (Nindoodemag Bagijiganan: A History Of Anishinaabeg Narrative.)

“… the appropriate acceptance of a bagijigan in Anishinaabemowin is miigwech — often translated as thank you. A clearer translation comes from the verb miigiwe (‘to give’). Miigwech is therefore to give a gift of gratitude and respect for the gift you have received. In other words, miigwech is a bagijigan.” (p 19)

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Task Force on Aboriginal Languages and Cultures. (2005). Part 4: First Nation, Inuit And Métis Languages: Where We Are Now. (Towards a New Beginning.)

“The vitality of languages may be determined by a number of factors. Two of the most commonly used measures are the number of ‘fluent’ speakers, and the rate at which successive generations learn and speak the language (intergenerational transmission).” (p 33)

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Twenge et al. (2018). Increases in Depressive Symptoms, Suicide-Related Outcomes, and Suicide Rates Among U.S. Adolescents After 2010 and Links to Increased New Media Screen Time.

“Adolescents who spent more time on new media (including social media and electronic devices such as smartphones) were more likely to report mental health issues, and adolescents who spent more time on nonscreen activities (in-person social interaction, sports/exercise, homework, print media, and attending religious services) were less likely.” (p 3)

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Eamer (2014). E-learning for Endangered Languages: What is the State of the Art?

“… it is only via fluent speakers that dying languages can be inter-generationally transmitted in order to once again become the mother tongues of a new generation.” (p 140)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 1 – Technology: Practice and Culture. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Yet those who operate these levers of power are able to do so partly because they can exploit deeper values relating to the so-called technological imperative, and to the basic creativity that makes innovation possible. This, I argue, is central part of the culture of technology …” (p 12)

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Mander (1991). Seven Negative Points About Computers. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“The real issue is not whether computers can benefit you or your group; the question is who benefits most from the existence of computers in society? The answer suggests that, for all of their small-scale benefits, the largest institutions have far more to gain, and they know it.” (p 68)

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