Logue (2016). Trump used as taunt against students and minority groups.

“Students take their cues for how to act from what they see happening out in the world, and ‘as [these incidents are] increasingly part of the national scene, I suspect we’ll see more of this,’ Ervin said. ‘College campuses are incubators of citizens of tomorrow, and they’ll take part in what they think is the political process.'” (¶ 15)

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Youngblood Henderson (2016). Postcolonial Ghost Dancing: Diagnosing European Colonialism. (Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures.)

“These colonialists saw themselves as continuing the work of the great seventeenth-century European thinkers who created the idea of an artificial society. In remote places, they constructed colonialism on their heritage of Eurocentrism, universality, and a strategy of difference. In the process, they either rejected or overlooked the Crown’s vision of treaty commonwealth in international law.” (p 169)

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Beardsley (1973). The American Scientist as Social Activist: Franz Boas, Burt G. Wilder, and the Cause of Racial Justice, 1900-1915.

“Eventually, of course, American science became an active force for racial egalitarianism, but allegedly the shift began only in the late 1920s, reaching its peak in the 1930s, when Nazi brutalities against European Jewry made the inherent dangers of racism more clear. In sum, American scientists were Johnny-come-latelies in advocating racial justice for Negroes.” (p 50)

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Justice (2016). “Go Away Water!” Kinship Criticism and the Decolonization Imperative.

“Kinship is adaptive; race, as a threatened constitutive commodity, always runs the risk of becoming washed out to the point of insignificance. … race-reading — rooted as it is in Eurowestern stereotypes and deficiency definitions — can only view Indians through a lens of eventual Indian erasure.” (p 362)

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Yosso (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth.

“… his [Bourdieu] theory of cultural capital has been used to assert that some communities are culturally wealthy while others are culturally poor. … In other words, cultural capital is not just inherited or possessed by the middle class, but rather it refers to an accumulation of specific forms of knowledge, skills and abilities that are _valued_ by privileged groups in society.” (p 76)

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Delpit & Dowdy (2002). No Kinda Sense.

“When instruction is stripped of children’s cultural legacies, then they are forced to believe that the world and all the good things in it were created by others. This leaves students further alienated from the school and its instructional goals, and more likely to view themselves as inadequate.” (p 41)

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Pezone (2010). Multiculturalism is Not Enough.

“While it is important that we recognize the contributions of those like Delpit who alert us to school politics of culture and language, it is vital that we engage in analysis and action to address the structural relationships of power and domination in our society, including social, economic, _and_ cultural aspects, and how they impact educational systems.” (p 29)

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