Ladefoged (1992). Another View of Endangered Languages.

“The case for studying endangered languages is very strong on linguistic grounds. It is often enormously strong on humanitarian grounds as well. But it would be self-serving of linguists to pretend that this is always the case. … We should always be sensitive to the concerns of the people whose language we are studying. But we should not assume that we know what is best for them.” (p 810)

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Canadian Press. (2018). Can U.S. border guards search your phone? Yes, and here are some details on how.

“Agents can demand a password to open your phone, without probable cause, Nielsen confirmed during the hearing. However, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) staff attorney Sophia Cope says the directive, which she calls confusing, also allows you to refuse to do so. That, of course, is not without its consequences she says in a statement to CBC News. Your device could be seized or detained. The border agent could delay your travel or even deny entry if you are not a U.S. citizen.” (¶ 9)

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Clarke (2017). Grounding care practices in theory: Exploring the potential for the ethics of care to provide theoretical justification for patient-centered care.

“… the families’ supporters argue for the importance of valuing traditional healing practices as fundamental cultural values that ought to be preserved and respected no matter what Western medicine might favour or predict.” (p 69)

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Bohaker & Dirks (2015). Privacy Impact Assessments and Microsoft & Google Vendor Contracts: Examining Canadian University eCommunications Outsourcing decisions.

“To give just one representative example, here is the short explanation given on the University of Manitoba’s ‘Frequently Asked Questions page about their Office 365 email deployment. The question: ‘is my email subject to US government laws? The answer: ‘Yes. However, the move to Office 365 results in no appreciable difference to what currently exists with our email. US and Canadian laws regarding email are very similar in nature.63. In making such claims, we noticed that the authors of PIAs and University ‘FAQ’ documents were drawing on conclusions also reached by some privacy commissioners and asserted by some privacy experts and product vendors. As we have found in our research, this argument is deeply flawed.64 Canadian jurisdiction offers significantly better privacy protection to Canadians and residents than US jurisdiction does, for example.” (p 19)

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Youngblood Henderson (2016). Postcolonial Ghost Dancing: Diagnosing European Colonialism. (Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures.)

“These colonialists saw themselves as continuing the work of the great seventeenth-century European thinkers who created the idea of an artificial society. In remote places, they constructed colonialism on their heritage of Eurocentrism, universality, and a strategy of difference. In the process, they either rejected or overlooked the Crown’s vision of treaty commonwealth in international law.” (p 169)

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Yao (2017). The Western Elite from a Chinese Perspective.

“What I realized is that if we look at one individual’s life in isolation, it is very tempting to come to the conclusion that one’s particular actions lead to whatever happens next. But if we look at the society as a whole or look across generations, we can see that people with very similar backgrounds can take similar actions and end up with vastly different results.” (¶38)

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Quinn (2016). Cultivating Sympathy and Reconciliation: The Importance of Sympathetic Response.

“… societies, and the individuals who make up those societies, must engage in a process of acknowledgement before any of the other acts of social rebuilding, like forgiveness and reconciliation, can take place (Govier 1999).” (p 123)

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Beaton, Burnard, Linden, & O’Donnell (2016). Keewaytinook Mobile: An Indigenous Community-Owned Mobile Phone Service in Northern Canada.

“… OCAP is an Indigenous response to the role of knowledge production in challenging colonial relations. … First, Indigenous communities must retain access and possession of the capacity and resources to effectively manage the content, traffic and services on their local network. Second, Indigenous communities have a right to own and control the local broadband network in their communities in order to support the flow of information and services (Kakekaspan et al. 2014).” (p 111)

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McCarty (2013). Language Regenesis in Practice.

“The language regeneration cases examined here have, as Dementi-Leonard and Gilmore observe, carved out space ‘for the freedom to resist and challenge oppressive obstacles’, to refute hegemonic attitudes, and to ‘envision the unseen’ (Dementi-Leonard & Gilmore , 1999: 53).” (p 154)

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