Hall (1984). Glossary. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

Enculturation. The process of learning a culture is called enculturation. The enculturation process usually progresses in stages; six-year-olds are more enculturated than three-year-olds, teenagers have almost completed the process and in many cases are under the impression that they have, which can be a source of tension between them and fully enculturated individuals.” (p 229)

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Hall (1984). Appendix II – Japanese and American Contrasts, with Special Reference to the MA. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“The closest one can come to understanding Japanese time is to approach via the route of MA. MA is time-space. … in the West we pay particular attention to the arrangement of objects, and in Japan it is the arrangement of the spaces — the intervals, MA — that are attended. In speech this means that it is the silences between words that also carry meaning and are significant.” (p 208)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Breaking Trail: Stories Outside the (Classroom) Box. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Many students have reported that ‘traditional life’ in the wilderness brings a feeling of serenity and peace to one’s heart and spirit” (p 186)

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Justice (2016). “Go Away Water!” Kinship Criticism and the Decolonization Imperative.

“Kinship is adaptive; race, as a threatened constitutive commodity, always runs the risk of becoming washed out to the point of insignificance. … race-reading — rooted as it is in Eurowestern stereotypes and deficiency definitions — can only view Indians through a lens of eventual Indian erasure.” (p 362)

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Hall (1984). Different Streams. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“I soon learned that I was dealing with at least four different time systems: Hopi time, Navajo time, government bureaucratic time, and the time used by the other white men (mostly Indian traders) who lived on the reservation. There was also Eastern tourist time, banker’s time (when notes were due), and many other variations of the white man’s time system.” (p 29)

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Schick (2014). White resentment in settler society.

“… having diversity policies in official documents means that you don’t actually have to carry out the diversity. Knowing enough to put in the policy is an example of white racial knowledge. Doing nothing about it is another.” (p 100)

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