Sontag (1973). A Brief Anthology of Quotations. (On Photography)

“If I were just curious, it would be very hard to say to someone, ‘I want to come to your house and have you talk to me and tell me the story of your life.’ I mean people are going to say, ‘You’re crazy.’ Plus they’re going to keep mighty guarded. But the camera is a kind of license. A lot of people, they want to be paid that much attention and that’s a reasonable kind of attention to be paid. — Diane Arbus” (p 149)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Spears (2005). Re-Constructing the Colonizer: Self-representation by First Nations Artists.

“Our artistic work is created around an obstacle course of colonial misunderstandings, cultural protocol, ethical concerns, community lateral violence and funding categories which sometimes attempt to determine the ‘Aboriginalness’ of the work.” (p 128)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Scherer (1992). The Photographic Document: Photographs as Primary Data in Anthropological Inquiry. (Anthropology and Photography, 1860-1920)

“… it is the premise of this essay that photographs can be used as primary data and as anthropological documents–not as replications of reality itself but as representations that require critical reading and interpretation …” (p 32)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Mydin (1992). Historical Images – Changing Audiences. (Anthropology and Photography, 1860-1920)

“The main themes may be summarized thus: the emergence of an anthropology, with an increasing institutional machinery, articulated contemporary ideas which were predominantly evolutionary, stressing as its object the living primal forms from which Western culture was assumed to have emerged.” (p 249)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Lutz & Collins (1993). The Photograph as an Intersection of Gazes. (Reading National Geographic)

“All photographs tell stories about looking. … By examining the ‘lines of sight’ evident in the _Geographic_ photograph of the non-Westerner, we become aware that it is not simply a captured view of the _other_, but rather a dynamic site at which many gazes or viewpoints intersect.” (p 187)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Blackman (1992). Of “Peculiar Carvings and Architectural Devices”: Photographic Ethnohistory and the Haida Indians. (Anthropology and Photography, 1860-1920)

“The images made by Dawson, Reford and other who journeyed to the Queen Charlotte Islands continue to serve, in ways their makers could not have envisioned, as a stimulus for studies of Haida art, architecture and cultural change.” (p 142)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Dippie (1992). Representing the Other: The North American Indian. (Anthropology and Photography, 1860-1920.)

“Many Indian portraits from the period raise this suspicion: the photographer knew what a noble savage should look like, and did not hesitate to impose his vision on his subjects. It could be in the tilt of a head to reveal a Roman profile, hand clutching a tomahawk to chest, or in dramatic lighting to pick out craggy features and an air of stoic resignation.” (p 132)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php