Franklin (2004). Chapter 2 (The Real World Of Technology).

“We should reflect on the possibility that technology that produces pseudorealities of ephemeral images and eliminates reciprocity also diminishes the sense of common humanity. … Where there is no reciprocity, there is no need for listening. There is then no need to understand or accommodate.” (p 45)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Levinson (2005). Survival of the Media Fit. (“The Soft Edge”, Chapter 9)

“The technological stage was set for motion photography to be more than a photocopy of life in action: scenes that followed one another in the real world could now be separated on film; scenes that had no connection in the real world could be brought together in the motion [page break] picture; and all at the behest of the filmmaker’s inner vision, via the expedient of a splice.” (p 96-97)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Adams (2015). Perception.

“I have always known that there were so many Indigenous people in Winnipeg who were leaders in the community or Indigenous people living average lives. … I realized how alive racism is in Winnipeg, and how many negative stereotypes of First Nations people are accepted as fact. I decided to ask models to pose for me and offered them a chance to label themselves.”

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Ozanne, Moscato & Kunkel (2013). Transformative Photography: Evaluation and Best Practices for Eliciting Social and Policy Changes.

“In 1888, police reporter Jacob Riis used the medium to record New York City’s crime-ridden and impoverished slums. His photographs coalesced public opinion and led to greater enforcement of existing laws and the creation of new building codes and apartment regulations. Sociologist Lewis Hine’s photographs of underage workers helped inspire the first federally sanctioned child labor laws in 1916 (Collier and Collier 1986). … Ordinary citizens use digital photographs to record extraordinary sights, such as the catalytic images disseminated during the ‘Arab Spring’ (Howard and Hussain 2011).” (p 45)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Wright (1992). Photography: Theories of Realism and Convention. (Anthropology and Photography, 1860-1920)

“The criticisms of the eye-camera analogy, the status of illusions in psychological experiments, the consideration of the organism in its environment, and criticisms of the argument from illusion all point to a new theory of perception. In this ecological approach to perception the emphasis moves to investigating the kinds of information available to the moving, actively engaged perceiver: perception not based on a fixed punctuate image.” (p 24)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Lutz & Collins (1993). A World Brightly Different: Photographic Conventions 1950-1986. (Reading National Geographic)

“The man in Western dress can be understood as desiring social change, material progress, and Westernization in other spheres. Exotic dress can stand for a premodern attitude, Western dress for a forward-looking Western orientation.” (p 93)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php