Evans (2011). A critical-realist response to the postmodern agenda in instructional design and technology: a way forward.

“Briefly, critical theory maintains that since science is an inherently social process, in which egos and ideologies frequently overcome rational thought, it must be riddled with nontheoretical interests.” (p 801)

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Nichols & Allen-Brown (1996). Critical theory and educational technology.

“Critical theorists also suggest that modern social crises, say in education or government, are related to the intrusion of overly rational (scientific, analytical, technological), instrumental, means-ends philosophies that detract from reflection on our ultimate ends — ends related to good and bad, right and wrong. Over time, we have largely abandoned moral perspectives.” (p 228)

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Heidegger (1977). The Question Concerning Technology. (The Question Concerning Technology and Other Essays)

“Everywhere we remain unfree and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or deny it. But we are delivered over to it in the worst possible way when we regard it as some­ thing neutral; for this conception of it, to which today we par­ticularly like to do homage, makes us utterly blind to the essence of technology.” (p 4)

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Baptiste (2001). Educating lone wolves: Pedagogical implications of human capital theory.

“Human capital theorists treat people as _homo economica_: radically isolated, pleasure-seeking materialists who are born free of social constraints or responsibility, who possess no intrinsic sociability, and who are driven, ultimately, by the desire for material happiness and bodily security. They assume that these desires are fundamentally the same for all people across space and time (stable preferences), and they believe that each individual will at all times attempt to maximally fulfill those hedonistic desires (maximizing behavior).” (p 195)

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McLuhan (2003). Art as Survival in the Electric Age. (Understanding Me: Lectures and Interviews)

“The enormous gap between man’s natural equipment and his technology has gotten bigger and bigger. I suggest that the artist’s role is to fill that gap by returning and modifying the perceptual apparatus that enables us to survive in a rapidly developing environment. Art provides the training and perception, the tuning or updating of the senses during technological advance.” (p 208)

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Slade (1975). The New Metamorphosis.

“Now that silver and coloured dreamworlds issue from the corners of every living room, there is a fresh tidal wave of interest in dreams, horoscopes, witches, magic, prophecies, food cults and other hallucinatory agents. Sometimes the flicker itself is construed as an alpha or beta wave on an encephalograph, little more than a squirming wriggle in the mud.” (p 132)

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