Pacey (1983). Chapter 3 – The Culture of Expertise. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Also noteworthy in this episode is the way each professional interprets the problem according to his own specific type of expertise. The chemist studies organic molecules, the automotive engineer redesigns vehicles, and the highway planner looks for ways to reduce congestion.” (p 44)

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Manjikian (2017). Social Construction of Technology: How objects acquire meaning in society. (Technology and World Politics: An Introduction.)

“While engineers physically construct or make an object, interest groups also construct the object — by virtue of the language they use to describe the object, the ways in which it is marketed and sold, and the ways in which it is regulated and understood.” (p 28)

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Mander (1991). Seven Negative Points About Computers. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“The real issue is not whether computers can benefit you or your group; the question is who benefits most from the existence of computers in society? The answer suggests that, for all of their small-scale benefits, the largest institutions have far more to gain, and they know it.” (p 68)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 4 (The Real World Of Technology).

“Many technological systems, when examined for context and overall design, are basically anti-people. … When students are seen as not sufficiently competent, it is likely to be computers that the school purchases rather than extra teacher’s time and extra human help. And when security agencies in this country feel that Canadian citizens harbour thoughts and might contemplate actions that the state doesn’t like, they don’t invite these citizens to discuss their grievances or alternate thoughts openly and on a basis of equality. Instead, telephones are tapped or files are assembled by purely technological means.” (p 71-72)

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The origin of “dead-lines”

“The horrors of that prison were so great that one man went over the line, and refused to leave it until he was shot dead. So great was the horror and misery of that place that I myself had thoughts of going over that dead-line to be shot in preference to living there.” (p 73)

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