Benjamin (2006). The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.

“For the first time in the process of pictorial reproduction, photography freed the hand of the most important artistic functions which henceforth devolved only upon the eye looking into a lens. Since the eye perceives more swiftly than the hand can draw, the process of pictorial reproduction was accelerated so enormously that it could keep pace with speech.” (p 19-20)

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Francis (2011). The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture.

“The Indian began as White man’s mistake, and became a White man’s fantasy. Through the prism of White hopes, fears and prejudices, indigenous Americans would be seen to have lost contact with reality and to have become ‘Indians’; that is, anything non-Natives wanted them to be.” (p 5)

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McLuhan (2003). Living at the Speed of Light (1974). (Understanding Me: Lectures and Interviews)

“… the problems of living in an acoustic world which is, in effect, a world of simultaneous information. The visual world has very peculiar properties, and the acoustic world has quite different properties. … The acoustic world, which is the electric world of simultaneity, has no continuity, no homogeneity, no connections, and no stasis.” (p 226)

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McLuhan (2003). Electronic Revolution: Revolutionary Effects of New Media. (Understanding Me: Lectures and Interviews)

“The electronic revolution of television has made the teacher the provider no longer of information but of insight, and the student not the consumer but the co-teacher, since he has already amassed so much information outside the classroom.” (p 1)

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McLuhan (2003). Art as Survival in the Electric Age. (Understanding Me: Lectures and Interviews)

“The enormous gap between man’s natural equipment and his technology has gotten bigger and bigger. I suggest that the artist’s role is to fill that gap by returning and modifying the perceptual apparatus that enables us to survive in a rapidly developing environment. Art provides the training and perception, the tuning or updating of the senses during technological advance.” (p 208)

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Slade (1975). The New Metamorphosis.

“Now that silver and coloured dreamworlds issue from the corners of every living room, there is a fresh tidal wave of interest in dreams, horoscopes, witches, magic, prophecies, food cults and other hallucinatory agents. Sometimes the flicker itself is construed as an alpha or beta wave on an encephalograph, little more than a squirming wriggle in the mud.” (p 132)

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