United Nations Economic and Social Council. (2018). Action plan for organizing the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages.

“Indigenous languages also represent complex systems of knowledge developed and accumulated over thousands of years. Local languages are indeed a kind of cultural treasure; they are repositories of diversity and key resources for both understanding the environment and utilizing it to the best advantage of local populations, as well as of humanity as a whole. They foster and promote local cultural specificities, customs and values which have endured for thousands of years.” (p 2-3)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 4 – Beliefs about Resources. (The Culture of Technology.)

“One study group has argued that we have an obligation to future generations to think fifty years ahead, and criticizes most commercial and political planning for its ‘horizon blindness’ beyond about ten years.” (p 67)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 3 – The Culture of Expertise. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Also noteworthy in this episode is the way each professional interprets the problem according to his own specific type of expertise. The chemist studies organic molecules, the automotive engineer redesigns vehicles, and the highway planner looks for ways to reduce congestion.” (p 44)

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Feenberg (2017). Critical theory of technology and STS.

“The dominant program is materialized in actual technologies through designed-in values and purposes. The dominant actors thus always have the ‘facts’ on their side. The anti-program may be confined at first to discursive expressions such as protests and demands articulating values different from those of the dominant actors. The subordinate actors’ demands usually appear to be unrealistic, ideological, in the face of the ‘facts’.” (p 6)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 2 – Beliefs about Progress. (The Culture of Technology.)

“… primarily, the factory was [page break] an invention concerning the organization of work, with an earlier origin than most of the machines it contained.” (p 18-19)

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Mander (1991). Seven Negative Points About Computers. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“The real issue is not whether computers can benefit you or your group; the question is who benefits most from the existence of computers in society? The answer suggests that, for all of their small-scale benefits, the largest institutions have far more to gain, and they know it.” (p 68)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 4 (The Real World Of Technology).

“Many technological systems, when examined for context and overall design, are basically anti-people. … When students are seen as not sufficiently competent, it is likely to be computers that the school purchases rather than extra teacher’s time and extra human help. And when security agencies in this country feel that Canadian citizens harbour thoughts and might contemplate actions that the state doesn’t like, they don’t invite these citizens to discuss their grievances or alternate thoughts openly and on a basis of equality. Instead, telephones are tapped or files are assembled by purely technological means.” (p 71-72)

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Bohaker & Dirks (2015). Privacy Impact Assessments and Microsoft & Google Vendor Contracts: Examining Canadian University eCommunications Outsourcing decisions.

“To give just one representative example, here is the short explanation given on the University of Manitoba’s ‘Frequently Asked Questions page about their Office 365 email deployment. The question: ‘is my email subject to US government laws? The answer: ‘Yes. However, the move to Office 365 results in no appreciable difference to what currently exists with our email. US and Canadian laws regarding email are very similar in nature.63. In making such claims, we noticed that the authors of PIAs and University ‘FAQ’ documents were drawing on conclusions also reached by some privacy commissioners and asserted by some privacy experts and product vendors. As we have found in our research, this argument is deeply flawed.64 Canadian jurisdiction offers significantly better privacy protection to Canadians and residents than US jurisdiction does, for example.” (p 19)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 3 (The Real World Of Technology.)

“One of the reasons I emphasize the link between public policies related to the provision of infrastructures and the spread of technology is the following: Rarely are there public discussions about the merits or problems of adopting a particular technology. … Regardless of who might own railways or transmission lines, radio [page break] … frequencies or satellites, the public sphere provides the space, the permission, the regulation, and the finances for much of the research. It is the public sphere that grants the ‘right of way.’ It seems to be high time that we, as citizens, become concerned about the granting of such technological rights of way.” (p 64-65)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 1 (The Real World Of Technology.)

“It is my conviction that nothing short of a global reformation of major social forces and of the social contract can end this historical period of profound and violent transformations, and give a manner of security to the world and to its citizens. … The viability of technology, like democracy, depends in the end on the practice of justice and on the enforcement of limits to power.” (p 5)

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