Brand, Herbert, & Boechler (2016). Language Vitalization through Mobile and Online Technologies in British Columbia.

“At its core, FirstVoices is an interactive multimedia dictionary and phrase collection containing thousands of text entries in many diverse Aboriginal writing systems, enhanced with sounds, pictures and videos. FirstVoices also offers tools for the recording of media-rich song and story collections. Some language archives at FirstVoices are publicly accessible, whereas others are password protected at the request of the language community.” (p 267)

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CSSE-SCÉÉ Roundtable: “Culture in the Balance: Risks and Rewards of Technology In Indigenous Language Learning”

“In an era defined by information technology, more often than not the question of why is being countered with an answer of why not, and any further dialogue withers. Thoughtful research and reflection of technology’s culturally-appropriate application in teaching and learning may not get adequate consideration — such scrutiny is often perceived as an impediment to the progress that technology is presumed to bring.”

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Delpit & Dowdy (2002). No Kinda Sense.

“When instruction is stripped of children’s cultural legacies, then they are forced to believe that the world and all the good things in it were created by others. This leaves students further alienated from the school and its instructional goals, and more likely to view themselves as inadequate.” (p 41)

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McCarty (2013). Contextualizing Native American LPP: Legal-Political, Demographic and Sociolinguistic Foundations.

“Like print literacies, technology-mediated documentation and revitalization ‘raise questions of access and power’; are these processes simply new forms of ‘storage and display, such as the museum and the archive?’, asks Eisenlohr (2004: 27).” (p 27)

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Kinasevych (2016). Time To Learn: Doing Away With Deadlines In Post-Secondary Education.

The assessment of learning was merged with time limits, “a compromise for the sake of administrative efficiency” (Wesman, 1949, p. 51). Deadline performance became a proxy for actual learning, thereby diminishing learner autonomy, motivation, and creativity (Deci & Ryan, 2012).

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Orr, Murphy, & Pearce (2007). Stories of School, Stories in School: Understanding Two Aboriginal Children’s Competing and Conflicting Stories of Curriculum.

“As we read our field notes we began to see how some of the children participated in events in both the in-classroom and out-of-classroom spaces of the school in a somewhat cautious and casual manner, positioning themselves and observing from the side rather than being in a moment in the class.” (p 277)

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