Boroditsky (2009). How Does Our Language Shape The Way We Think? (What’s Next?: Dispatches on the Future of Science.)

“… English speakers prefer to talk about duration in terms of length (e.g., ‘That was a short talk,’ ‘The meeting didn’t take long‘), while Spanish and Greek speakers prefer to talk about time in terms of amount, relying more on words like ‘much’ ‘big’, and ‘little’ rather than ‘short’ and ‘long’ …” (p 123-124)

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Swoyer (2003). The Linguistic Relativity Hypothesis.

“But what is easy to say in one language may be harder to say in a second, and this may make it easier or more natural or more common for speakers of the first language to think in a certain way than for speakers of the second language to do so. A concept or category may be more available in some linguistic communities than in others.” (¶ 39)

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Hall (1984). Experiencing Time. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“This principle is illustrated by the way in which we have taken our own biological clocks, moved them outside ourselves, and then treated the extensions as though they represented the only reality. … Because of extension transference, the schedule is the reality and people and their needs are not considered.” (p 131)

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Hall (1984). The French, the Germans, and the Americans. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“The most basic of culture patterns are acquired in the home, and begin with the baby’s synchronizing his or her movements with the mother’s voice. Language and our relations with others build on that basic foundation of rhythm. … When the child enters school, however, the culture comes on full force. Schools instruct us how to make the system work and communicate that we are forever in the hands of administrators. Bells tell everyone when they must begin learning and when to stop.” (p 108-109)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechiseechigemitowin, Strategic Alliances: Connection to the Content. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Having a personal relationship with students meant the teachers were aware of the characteristics and interests of their students and were able to use these to connect students to the curriculum.” (p 167)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Iseechigehina, Planned Actions: Connection to the Process. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“No single teaching approach was used for every class or by every teacher to effectively connect students to the process of learning. Each teacher used a variety of approaches that included mastery learning, concrete materials, storytelling, one-on-one, the talking or sharing circle, group work, and learning that was experiential, community-based, activity-based, or land-based learning.” (p 148)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weetutoskemitowin, Working Together: Social Systems. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The use of Indigenous language, patterns of communication, and incorporation of Indigenous knowledge and values in the class created a sense of familiarity and belonging, so that students would be open to learning.” (p 122)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechihitowin, Helping and Supporting Relationships: The Foundation. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Trust was also related to setting and enforcing clear expectations and boundaries for performance and behaviour. Students needed to trust that a teacher would be firm in dealing with inappropriate behaviour, impose fair consequences, and follow up.” (p 110)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). How to Get There: Conceptualizing Effective Teaching. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The principles of effective teaching for Indigenous students apply to all students, but Indigenous education has unique features based on the history, culture, and philosophies of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples, who tend to view the world in a more holistic way than the European framework that is the basis of our education system in Canada.” (p 78)

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