Selwyn (2016). Minding our language: why education and technology is full of bullshit… and what might be done about it.

“Perhaps, we need a language of education and technology that unpacks more aptly the underlying functions of these technologies and exposes their political intent.” (p 441-442)

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Bachmann (2017). Just in case you meet an alien: Here’s where to learn Klingon.

“Even though the Klingon race is fictional, the spoken language — invented in 1984 by American linguist Marc Okrand — is now being taught at Migros Club School, Switzerland’s largest adult education institution.” (¶2)

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Aagaard (2017). Breaking down barriers: The ambivalent nature of technologies in the classroom.

“Combined, these discourses lead us to _the paradox of educational technology_: When something good happens, we praise technology; but when something bad happens, we blame the students (occasionally, this blame also extends to their teachers).” (p 1129)

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Marshall (2018). Student time choices and success.

“… the results strongly suggest that the majority of first-year students at the institution studied are investing more hours than are designed by teachers, some reaching more than double a full-time workload during the period studied.

“Overwork can be a serious issue and anecdotally students are susceptible in some disciplines, such as computer science, architecture and design, to overwork substantially beyond the expectations and requirements of courses.” (p 1226)

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Task Force on Aboriginal Languages and Cultures. (2005). Part 4: First Nation, Inuit And Métis Languages: Where We Are Now. (Towards a New Beginning.)

“The vitality of languages may be determined by a number of factors. Two of the most commonly used measures are the number of ‘fluent’ speakers, and the rate at which successive generations learn and speak the language (intergenerational transmission).” (p 33)

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Spitzer (2014). Information technology in education: Risks and side effects.

“… we have evidence that humans can learn how to multitask just about as much as they can learn how to fly.” (p 84)

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United Nations Economic and Social Council. (2018). Action plan for organizing the 2019 International Year of Indigenous Languages.

“Indigenous languages also represent complex systems of knowledge developed and accumulated over thousands of years. Local languages are indeed a kind of cultural treasure; they are repositories of diversity and key resources for both understanding the environment and utilizing it to the best advantage of local populations, as well as of humanity as a whole. They foster and promote local cultural specificities, customs and values which have endured for thousands of years.” (p 2-3)

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Eamer (2014). E-learning for Endangered Languages: What is the State of the Art?

“… it is only via fluent speakers that dying languages can be inter-generationally transmitted in order to once again become the mother tongues of a new generation.” (p 140)

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