Harris (2014). Chapter 3: The Riddle of the Self. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion.)

“The sense that we are unified subjects is a fiction, produced by a multitude of separate processes and structures of which we are not aware and over which we exert no conscious control.” (¶95)

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Harris (2014). Chapter 2: The Mystery of Consciousness. (Waking Up: A Guide to Spirituality Without Religion.)

“What is most startling about the split-brain phenomenon is that we have every reason to believe that the isolated right hemisphere is independently conscious.” (¶38)

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Patton, M. A. (2000). The Importance of Being Flexible with Assignment Deadlines.

“This article suggests ways in which course providers, by circumventing traditional academic policies and showing maximum flexibility and understanding to non-traditional students, can bring high-risk students long-term positive results …” (p 417)

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Gomez-Zuebisch (2010). Introduction. (A phenomenological exploration of the learning values derived from instructional short videos among adult learners.)

“To this resistance, Mitra responded with a quote from the science fiction writer Sir Arthur C. Clarke who stated ‘A teacher that can be replaced by a machine should be’.” (p 27)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 10 (The Real World Of Technology).

“While the pool of information available to the students may increase, the pool of available understanding may not. This has considerable consequences for social [page break] cohesion and peace and deserves careful attention.” (p 171-172)

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Roché. (2018). Switzerland’s mysterious fourth language.

“…but now people are tired of everything being the same everywhere. It’s seen as hip and cool to go back to your roots and be more local than global.” (¶15)

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Chambers (2015). Language Nests as an Emergent Global Phenomenon.

“This literature review demonstrates that approaches to language nest program development and delivery are shaped by many factors such as: Indigenous language status within the community, population size, availability of fluent speakers and early childhood educators, state legislation and funding, and access to materials and resources in the target language.” (p 26)

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Everett-Green (2015). How my neighbourhood looks and sounds in Ojibway.

“In another Spreecast, about learning indigenous languages, Coast Salish teacher Khelsilem Rivers, founder of the Skwomesh Language Academy in Squamish, B.C., said he isn’t interested in language apps, CD-ROMs or anything that involves working from English translations. Fluency is impossible with ‘that English brain controlling things.’ Full immersion is the only way, he said…” (¶21)

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Morris (2016). An Example of Excellence: Chickasaw Language Revitalization through Technology.

“Indeed, through this article, in the Western academic sense, we see technology, adaption and adoption, synthesis and innovation by the Chickasaw Nation. But those from Native communities, including this author, see self-determination in praxis. Language is a matter of cultural survival.” (p 302)

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