Fleming (2003). Building Personal and Nation-State Identities: Research and Practice.

“As a number of theorists have pointed out (Hall, 1992; White & Hunt, 2000), personal identity is closely interconnected with collective or national identities. National identity and culture often appear to be unchanging and unidimensional, systems of symbols, behaviors, and values that are somehow immutable or even ethereal (Fulford, 1993). Every nation-state must ‘create a coherent national identity and … subordinate sub-regional or diverse ethnic identities in order to complement ideologically the economic union’ (Teeple, 2000, p. 164).” (p 68)

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Kinasevych (2017). Culture in the Balance: Risks and Rewards of Technology in Indigenous Language Learning.

Kinasevych, O. (2017, May). Culture in the Balance: Risks and Rewards of Technology in Indigenous Language Learning. Presented at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2017 & 2017 Conference of the Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE), Toronto.   References Abele, F., & Stasiulis, D. (1989). Canada as a “White Settler … Read more

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Brand, Herbert, & Boechler (2016). Language Vitalization through Mobile and Online Technologies in British Columbia.

“At its core, FirstVoices is an interactive multimedia dictionary and phrase collection containing thousands of text entries in many diverse Aboriginal writing systems, enhanced with sounds, pictures and videos. FirstVoices also offers tools for the recording of media-rich song and story collections. Some language archives at FirstVoices are publicly accessible, whereas others are password protected at the request of the language community.” (p 267)

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CSSE-SCÉÉ Roundtable: “Culture in the Balance: Risks and Rewards of Technology In Indigenous Language Learning”

“In an era defined by information technology, more often than not the question of why is being countered with an answer of why not, and any further dialogue withers. Thoughtful research and reflection of technology’s culturally-appropriate application in teaching and learning may not get adequate consideration — such scrutiny is often perceived as an impediment to the progress that technology is presumed to bring.”

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