Roché. (2018). Switzerland’s mysterious fourth language.

“…but now people are tired of everything being the same everywhere. It’s seen as hip and cool to go back to your roots and be more local than global.” (¶15)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 7 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… we are not dealing here merely with recasting an old task — that of sending and receiving messages — into a new technological setting. We have to deal with different and quite new social relationships that now superimpose existing ones.” (p 144)

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Chambers (2015). Language Nests as an Emergent Global Phenomenon.

“This literature review demonstrates that approaches to language nest program development and delivery are shaped by many factors such as: Indigenous language status within the community, population size, availability of fluent speakers and early childhood educators, state legislation and funding, and access to materials and resources in the target language.” (p 26)

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Everett-Green (2015). How my neighbourhood looks and sounds in Ojibway.

“In another Spreecast, about learning indigenous languages, Coast Salish teacher Khelsilem Rivers, founder of the Skwomesh Language Academy in Squamish, B.C., said he isn’t interested in language apps, CD-ROMs or anything that involves working from English translations. Fluency is impossible with ‘that English brain controlling things.’ Full immersion is the only way, he said…” (¶21)

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Snyder (2017). On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.

“You submit to tyranny when you renounce the difference between what you want to hear and what is actually the case. This renunciation of reality can feel natural and pleasant, but the result is your demise as an individual — and thus the collapse of any political system that depends upon individualism.”

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Morris (2016). An Example of Excellence: Chickasaw Language Revitalization through Technology.

“Indeed, through this article, in the Western academic sense, we see technology, adaption and adoption, synthesis and innovation by the Chickasaw Nation. But those from Native communities, including this author, see self-determination in praxis. Language is a matter of cultural survival.” (p 302)

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Vowel (2016). Culture and Identity. (Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit issues in Canada.)

“Listening to, or reading, authentic Indigenous stories means you are accessing different cultures. Please don’t forget that. Sometimes, what you are reading simply will not make sense to you because you lack the cultural context.” (p 98)

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Ladefoged (1992). Another View of Endangered Languages.

“The case for studying endangered languages is very strong on linguistic grounds. It is often enormously strong on humanitarian grounds as well. But it would be self-serving of linguists to pretend that this is always the case. … We should always be sensitive to the concerns of the people whose language we are studying. But we should not assume that we know what is best for them.” (p 810)

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Kemper (2016). Cultural Hybridity, Resilience and the Communication of Contemporary Cherokee Culture through Mobile Technologies. (Indigenous People and Mobile Technologies.)

“Since adaptability is inevitable, the original culture makes the best of things, as we will see in the example of the Cherokee and mobile technologies.” (p 243)

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