Pacey (1983). Chapter 4 – Beliefs about Resources. (The Culture of Technology.)

“One study group has argued that we have an obligation to future generations to think fifty years ahead, and criticizes most commercial and political planning for its ‘horizon blindness’ beyond about ten years.” (p 67)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 3 – The Culture of Expertise. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Also noteworthy in this episode is the way each professional interprets the problem according to his own specific type of expertise. The chemist studies organic molecules, the automotive engineer redesigns vehicles, and the highway planner looks for ways to reduce congestion.” (p 44)

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Feenberg (2017). Critical theory of technology and STS.

“The dominant program is materialized in actual technologies through designed-in values and purposes. The dominant actors thus always have the ‘facts’ on their side. The anti-program may be confined at first to discursive expressions such as protests and demands articulating values different from those of the dominant actors. The subordinate actors’ demands usually appear to be unrealistic, ideological, in the face of the ‘facts’.” (p 6)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 2 – Beliefs about Progress. (The Culture of Technology.)

“… primarily, the factory was [page break] an invention concerning the organization of work, with an earlier origin than most of the machines it contained.” (p 18-19)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 1 – Technology: Practice and Culture. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Yet those who operate these levers of power are able to do so partly because they can exploit deeper values relating to the so-called technological imperative, and to the basic creativity that makes innovation possible. This, I argue, is central part of the culture of technology …” (p 12)

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Crosby (1997). Time. (The Measure of Reality.)

“For generations the town clock was the one complicated machine that hundreds of thousands saw every day, heard over and over again every day and night. It taught them that invisible, inaudible, seamless time was composed of quanta. It, like money, taught them quantification.” (p 85)

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Franklin (2004). Coda (The Real World Of Technology).

“One precondition for pressing for systemic changes is an understanding of the ongoing dynamics of technology and power. … For instance, over the unending din of economic rhetoric, we need to speak of what happens to people.” (p 177)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 10 (The Real World Of Technology).

“While the pool of information available to the students may increase, the pool of available understanding may not. This has considerable consequences for social [page break] cohesion and peace and deserves careful attention.” (p 171-172)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 8 (The Real World Of Technology).

“It is well to remember that Immanuel Kant saw time and space not as external media within which people move, but as ordering devices of the human mind.” (p 149)

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