Mander (1991). Seven Negative Points About Computers. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“The real issue is not whether computers can benefit you or your group; the question is who benefits most from the existence of computers in society? The answer suggests that, for all of their small-scale benefits, the largest institutions have far more to gain, and they know it.” (p 68)

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Said (1994). Chapter 1 – Overlapping Territories, Intertwined Histories. (Culture and Imperialism.)

“The wonder of it is that the schooling for such relatively provincial thought and action is still prevalent, unchecked, uncritically accepted, recurringly replicated in the education of generation after generation. We are all taught to venerate our nations and admire our traditions: we are taught to pursue their interests with toughness and in disregard for other societies. A new and in my opinion appalling tribalism is fracturing societies, separating peoples, promoting greed, bloody conflict, and uninteresting assertions of minor ethnic or group particularity.” (p 20)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 8 (The Real World Of Technology).

“It is well to remember that Immanuel Kant saw time and space not as external media within which people move, but as ordering devices of the human mind.” (p 149)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 7 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… we are not dealing here merely with recasting an old task — that of sending and receiving messages — into a new technological setting. We have to deal with different and quite new social relationships that now superimpose existing ones.” (p 144)

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Chambers (2015). Language Nests as an Emergent Global Phenomenon.

“This literature review demonstrates that approaches to language nest program development and delivery are shaped by many factors such as: Indigenous language status within the community, population size, availability of fluent speakers and early childhood educators, state legislation and funding, and access to materials and resources in the target language.” (p 26)

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Everett-Green (2015). How my neighbourhood looks and sounds in Ojibway.

“In another Spreecast, about learning indigenous languages, Coast Salish teacher Khelsilem Rivers, founder of the Skwomesh Language Academy in Squamish, B.C., said he isn’t interested in language apps, CD-ROMs or anything that involves working from English translations. Fluency is impossible with ‘that English brain controlling things.’ Full immersion is the only way, he said…” (¶21)

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Hall (1984). God is in the Details. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“According to Fuentes, our denial of the past has led to the degradation of morality and the denial of the lessons of the past. Denial of the rights as well as the reality of other cultures is another of the consequences of Western time concepts.” (p 201-202)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Ininee mamitoneneetumowin, Indigenous Thinking: Emerging Theory of Indigenous Education. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“However, one of the contradictions of schooling is while it can be an institution of colonization, it also has the potential to decolonize (Smith 2000) and support the development of self-determination for Indigenous students and their communities.” (p 200)

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Hale (1998). On endangered languages and the importance of linguistic diversity.

“The fact is, an enormous body of cultural and intellectual wealth was lost irretrievably in the course of the European colonization of the New World and the South. It was lost utterly and without being noticed, primarily because it was mental wealth, appreciable only through the language which was lost with it.” (p 193)

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Brumble (1998). Vine Deloria, Jr., Creationism, and Ethnic Pseudoscience.

“I do want to point out that Deloria, the creationists, and the melanin scholars differ importantly from scientists. Deloria et al. are fundamentally antirational — even as they try to wrap the mantle of science about their beliefs.” (p 341)

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