Pacey (1983). Chapter 5 – Imperatives and Creative Culture. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Dickson notes that heavy industry had ‘an almost mystical significance’ in the early years of the Russian revolution, and comments that the ‘significance attached to technology’ under these circumstances often ‘disguises the exploitative and alienating role technology plays’ within industrial societies.” (p 93)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 4 – Beliefs about Resources. (The Culture of Technology.)

“One study group has argued that we have an obligation to future generations to think fifty years ahead, and criticizes most commercial and political planning for its ‘horizon blindness’ beyond about ten years.” (p 67)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 3 – The Culture of Expertise. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Also noteworthy in this episode is the way each professional interprets the problem according to his own specific type of expertise. The chemist studies organic molecules, the automotive engineer redesigns vehicles, and the highway planner looks for ways to reduce congestion.” (p 44)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 2 – Beliefs about Progress. (The Culture of Technology.)

“… primarily, the factory was [page break] an invention concerning the organization of work, with an earlier origin than most of the machines it contained.” (p 18-19)

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Manjikian (2017). Social Construction of Technology: How objects acquire meaning in society. (Technology and World Politics: An Introduction.)

“While engineers physically construct or make an object, interest groups also construct the object — by virtue of the language they use to describe the object, the ways in which it is marketed and sold, and the ways in which it is regulated and understood.” (p 28)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 1 – Technology: Practice and Culture. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Yet those who operate these levers of power are able to do so partly because they can exploit deeper values relating to the so-called technological imperative, and to the basic creativity that makes innovation possible. This, I argue, is central part of the culture of technology …” (p 12)

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Mander (1991). The Importance Of The Negative View. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“Meanwhile, industry, the media, and the government were all repeating the mantra that technology serves progress and that progress equals more technology.” (p 39)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 6 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… if somebody robs a store, it’s a crime and the state is all set and ready to nab the criminal. But if somebody steals from the commons and from the future, it’s seen as entrepreneurial activity and the state cheers and gives them tax concessions rather than arresting them.” (p 123)

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Mander (1991). Fantasy And Reality. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“Living constantly inside an environment of our own invention, reacting solely to things we ourselves have created, we are essentially living _inside our own minds_. Where evolution was once an interactive process between human beings and a natural, unmediated world, evolution is now an interaction between human beings and our own artifacts.” (p 32)

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Mander (1991). Growing Up With Technology. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“By our silence we gave our tacit approval. … The parameters of the discussion, even the parameters of thought, were predefined by corporate, governmental, and scientific institutions.” (p 23)

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