Goulet & Goulet (2014). Breaking Trail: Stories Outside the (Classroom) Box. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Many students have reported that ‘traditional life’ in the wilderness brings a feeling of serenity and peace to one’s heart and spirit” (p 186)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Hall (1984). Entrainment. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“Viewed in the context of human behavior, time is organization. However, Condon’s insights include much more. For example, the definition of the self is deeply embedded in the rhythmic synchronic process. This is because rhythm is inherent in organization, and therefore has a basic design function in the organization of the personality.” (p 180)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Hall (1984). The Dance of Life. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“One clue is that the Japanese are more aware of synchrony than the average Westerner. Those tremendous Sumo wrestlers, for example, must synchronize their breathing before the referee will allow the match to begin, and the audience is fully aware of what is happening. In this same vein, Japanese who are conversing will frequently monitor their own breathing in order to stay in sync with their interlocutor!” (p 164)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). Ininee mamitoneneetumowin, Indigenous Thinking: Emerging Theory of Indigenous Education. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“However, one of the contradictions of schooling is while it can be an institution of colonization, it also has the potential to decolonize (Smith 2000) and support the development of self-determination for Indigenous students and their communities.” (p 200)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Youngblood Henderson (2016). Postcolonial Ghost Dancing: Diagnosing European Colonialism. (Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures.)

“These colonialists saw themselves as continuing the work of the great seventeenth-century European thinkers who created the idea of an artificial society. In remote places, they constructed colonialism on their heritage of Eurocentrism, universality, and a strategy of difference. In the process, they either rejected or overlooked the Crown’s vision of treaty commonwealth in international law.” (p 169)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Hale (1998). On endangered languages and the importance of linguistic diversity.

“The fact is, an enormous body of cultural and intellectual wealth was lost irretrievably in the course of the European colonization of the New World and the South. It was lost utterly and without being noticed, primarily because it was mental wealth, appreciable only through the language which was lost with it.” (p 193)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechiseechigemitowin, Strategic Alliances: Connection to the Content. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Having a personal relationship with students meant the teachers were aware of the characteristics and interests of their students and were able to use these to connect students to the curriculum.” (p 167)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Lucy (2015). Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis. (International Encyclopedia of the Social & Behavioral Sciences.)

“The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, also known as the linguistic relativity hypothesis, refers to the proposal that the particular language one speaks influences the way one thinks about reality.” (p 903)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Justice (2016). “Go Away Water!” Kinship Criticism and the Decolonization Imperative.

“Kinship is adaptive; race, as a threatened constitutive commodity, always runs the risk of becoming washed out to the point of insignificance. … race-reading — rooted as it is in Eurowestern stereotypes and deficiency definitions — can only view Indians through a lens of eventual Indian erasure.” (p 362)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Hall (1984). Culture’s Clocks: Nuer, Tiv, and Quiché Time. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“Words, after all, are symbols, and while it is the symbols that are used to describe what the people do, somehow in this process the symbols and the story they tell take on a life of their own.” (p 83)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php