Francis (2011). The Imaginary Indian: The Image of the Indian in Canadian Culture.

“The Indian began as White man’s mistake, and became a White man’s fantasy. Through the prism of White hopes, fears and prejudices, indigenous Americans would be seen to have lost contact with reality and to have become ‘Indians’; that is, anything non-Natives wanted them to be.” (p 5)

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Curtis (2006). The North American Indian, Vol. 1.

“Yet the fact that the Indian and his surroundings lend themselves to artistic treatment has not been lost sight of, for in his country one may treat limitless subjects of an aesthetic character without in any way doing injustice to scientific accuracy or neglecting the homelier phases of aboriginal life.” (p xxiii)

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Truchon (2007). Challenging Stereotypes about First Nations Children and Youth.

“… when asked to document what they like and dislike in their community, the participants mainly chose to photograph and comment on positive aspects of their lives. The relational nature of the annotated photographs and the editorial choices of the participants highlights the responsibility of both mass media and academic literature to balance their reporting with young people’s input.” (p 254)

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“Cultural Reflection And Cross-Cultural Bridges Through The Photographic Process”

The act of photography exposes the photographer to the subject, inasmuch as the subject is exposed to the photographer. This mutual exposure creates an opportunity for engagement. The act of photography provides for a dialogue between the subject and an imagined audience, with the photographer as intermediary.

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