Goulet & Goulet (2014). Iseechigehina, Planned Actions: Connection to the Process. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“No single teaching approach was used for every class or by every teacher to effectively connect students to the process of learning. Each teacher used a variety of approaches that included mastery learning, concrete materials, storytelling, one-on-one, the talking or sharing circle, group work, and learning that was experiential, community-based, activity-based, or land-based learning.” (p 148)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weetutoskemitowin, Working Together: Social Systems. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The use of Indigenous language, patterns of communication, and incorporation of Indigenous knowledge and values in the class created a sense of familiarity and belonging, so that students would be open to learning.” (p 122)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechihitowin, Helping and Supporting Relationships: The Foundation. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Trust was also related to setting and enforcing clear expectations and boundaries for performance and behaviour. Students needed to trust that a teacher would be firm in dealing with inappropriate behaviour, impose fair consequences, and follow up.” (p 110)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Hall (1984). Different Streams. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“I soon learned that I was dealing with at least four different time systems: Hopi time, Navajo time, government bureaucratic time, and the time used by the other white men (mostly Indian traders) who lived on the reservation. There was also Eastern tourist time, banker’s time (when notes were due), and many other variations of the white man’s time system.” (p 29)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Brumble (1998). Vine Deloria, Jr., Creationism, and Ethnic Pseudoscience.

“I do want to point out that Deloria, the creationists, and the melanin scholars differ importantly from scientists. Deloria et al. are fundamentally antirational — even as they try to wrap the mantle of science about their beliefs.” (p 341)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Meier (2017). UC Berkeley Uses Optical Scanning to Recover Indigenous Voices from Wax Cylinders.

“A project underway at UC Berkeley is using innovative optical scan technology to transfer and digitally restore these recordings … ‘Documenting Endangered Languages,’ … aims to preserve about 100 hours of audio.” (¶2)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). How to Get There: Conceptualizing Effective Teaching. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The principles of effective teaching for Indigenous students apply to all students, but Indigenous education has unique features based on the history, culture, and philosophies of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples, who tend to view the world in a more holistic way than the European framework that is the basis of our education system in Canada.” (p 78)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Clarke (2017). Grounding care practices in theory.

“Health professionals are often encouraged to consider evidence as the guiding source for difficult decision. While evidence-based practice is valuable, medical evidence does not exist outside of the relational context of treatment.” (p 79-80)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Mitchell, Guichon, & Wong (2015). Caring for children, focusing on children.

“A more recent report claims that ‘Racism against Indigenous peoples in the healthcare system is so pervasive that people strategize around anticipated racism before visiting the emergency department or, in some cases, avoid care altogether’ (13).” (p 294)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php

Goulet & Goulet (2014). What to Build Upon: Sociocultural Strengths. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The concept is further complicated because, in addition to living beings, it includes life force entities such as toboggans, spears, cars, record players, and so on. These latter entities are considered forms of life, not inanimate objects or things.” (p 56)

See this page at https://kinasevych.ca/index.php