Bohachevsky-Chomiak (1967). The Spring of a Nation: The Ukrainians in Eastern Galicia in 1848.

“The Ukrainians in Galicia, meanwhile, realized that the disturbances of the spring of 1848 were more than just a renewed attempt by the Poles to restore an independent Poland. They therefore began to assert their rights.” (p 28)

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Clarke (2017). Grounding care practices in theory: Exploring the potential for the ethics of care to provide theoretical justification for patient-centered care.

“… the families’ supporters argue for the importance of valuing traditional healing practices as fundamental cultural values that ought to be preserved and respected no matter what Western medicine might favour or predict.” (p 69)

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Kemper (2016). Cultural Hybridity, Resilience and the Communication of Contemporary Cherokee Culture through Mobile Technologies. (Indigenous People and Mobile Technologies.)

“Since adaptability is inevitable, the original culture makes the best of things, as we will see in the example of the Cherokee and mobile technologies.” (p 243)

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Hall (1984). Glossary. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

Enculturation. The process of learning a culture is called enculturation. The enculturation process usually progresses in stages; six-year-olds are more enculturated than three-year-olds, teenagers have almost completed the process and in many cases are under the impression that they have, which can be a source of tension between them and fully enculturated individuals.” (p 229)

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Hall (1984). God is in the Details. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“According to Fuentes, our denial of the past has led to the degradation of morality and the denial of the lessons of the past. Denial of the rights as well as the reality of other cultures is another of the consequences of Western time concepts.” (p 201-202)

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Rymhs (2016). Appropriating Guilt: Reconciliation in an Indigenous Canadian Context. (Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures.)

“Guilt, in effect, becomes a dissolute concept, swept into colonial history, attributed to past government policies, or directed at faceless institutions rather than being individually or personally owned. At times bypassing the attribution of responsibility altogether, the process of reconciliation overlooks the logic that asking for forgiveness does not imply the granting of it. The success always implied by the act of reconciliation dissolves the wronged subject’s agency as the public, the government, and its institutions forgive themselves.” (p 327)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Breaking Trail: Stories Outside the (Classroom) Box. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Many students have reported that ‘traditional life’ in the wilderness brings a feeling of serenity and peace to one’s heart and spirit” (p 186)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Ininee mamitoneneetumowin, Indigenous Thinking: Emerging Theory of Indigenous Education. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“However, one of the contradictions of schooling is while it can be an institution of colonization, it also has the potential to decolonize (Smith 2000) and support the development of self-determination for Indigenous students and their communities.” (p 200)

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Youngblood Henderson (2016). Postcolonial Ghost Dancing: Diagnosing European Colonialism. (Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures.)

“These colonialists saw themselves as continuing the work of the great seventeenth-century European thinkers who created the idea of an artificial society. In remote places, they constructed colonialism on their heritage of Eurocentrism, universality, and a strategy of difference. In the process, they either rejected or overlooked the Crown’s vision of treaty commonwealth in international law.” (p 169)

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Beardsley (1973). The American Scientist as Social Activist: Franz Boas, Burt G. Wilder, and the Cause of Racial Justice, 1900-1915.

“Eventually, of course, American science became an active force for racial egalitarianism, but allegedly the shift began only in the late 1920s, reaching its peak in the 1930s, when Nazi brutalities against European Jewry made the inherent dangers of racism more clear. In sum, American scientists were Johnny-come-latelies in advocating racial justice for Negroes.” (p 50)

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