Levinson (2005). Survival of the Media Fit. (“The Soft Edge”, Chapter 9)

“The technological stage was set for motion photography to be more than a photocopy of life in action: scenes that followed one another in the real world could now be separated on film; scenes that had no connection in the real world could be brought together in the motion [page break] picture; and all at the behest of the filmmaker’s inner vision, via the expedient of a splice.” (p 96-97)

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De Zwart (2014). Ai Weiwei is Living in Our Future.

“It is not only the government who is following us and trying to influence our behavior. In fact, it is the standard business model of the Internet. Our behaviour on the Internet is nearly always mediated by a third party. … The biggest commercial intermediary is Google who by now decides, among other things how I walk from the station to the theatre, in which way I will treat the symptoms of my cold, whether an email I’ve sent to somebody else should be marked as spam, where best I can book a hotel, and whether or not I have an appointment next week Thursday.” (¶22)

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Feenberg (2010). Critical Theory of Technology.

“The computer simplifies a full blown person into a ‘user’ in order to incorporate him or her into the network. Users are decontextualized in the sense that they are stripped of body and community in front of the terminal and positioned as detached technical subjects. At the same time, a highly simplified world is disclosed to the user which is open to the initiatives of rational consumers.” (p 9)

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Wajcman (2008). Life in the fast lane? Towards a sociology of technology and time.

“The first and most measurable form of acceleration is the speeding up of transport, communication and production that can be defined as technological acceleration. The second is the acceleration of social change, meaning that the rate of societal change is itself accelerating. The central idea here is that institutional stability (in the realms of the family and occupations, for example) is generally on the decline in late-modern societies.” (p 62)

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Hlynka & Yeaman (1992). Postmodern Educational Technology.

“Producing information is a major economic force that ties postmodern theory to educational technology. … The field of educational technology was built on the positivist, modernist search for a best medium towards universal communication and the teaching of predetermined behavior and thinking patterns. … The past emphasis of educational technology on automated delivery systems favors the biases of the industrial, scientific, modern era.” (p 1)

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Yeaman (1994). Deconstruction and Visuals: Is This a Telephone?

“The deception here is … in blindly accepting that achieving technological imaginings is always desirable. … The analogy of human activities to machine processes seduces intellect. According to the equipment-minded definition, understanding is not necessary for communication, only the transmission and reception of data. This suggests that meaning is unequivocable, plain, and undeniable; that communication is principally one way; that it is something people should do to other people because there are leaders who have voice and followers who hear and obey; and that these cultural conventions are the natural state.” (p 318)

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