McCarty (2013). Contextualizing Native American LPP: Legal-Political, Demographic and Sociolinguistic Foundations.

“Like print literacies, technology-mediated documentation and revitalization ‘raise questions of access and power’; are these processes simply new forms of ‘storage and display, such as the museum and the archive?’, asks Eisenlohr (2004: 27).” (p 27)

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Kulchyski (2007). The red Indians.

“the government did not define indians as indians in order to give them indian ‘status.’ it defined them as indians as a legal tool, in order to take measures against them. instead of wanting to be enfranchised, instead of lining up to apply to gain canadian citizenship, in one of the great unwritten episodes of canadian history, the vast majority of indians voted with their feet on whether they wanted rights as canadian citizens or rights as indians: they were massively in favour of remaining indian.” (p 64)

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Justice & Stanley (2016). Teaching in the Time of Trump.

“Public schools exist, in part, for the political purpose of instilling the principal values of a democratic republic, training students in the skills and knowledge requisite to healthy democratic life. In a time when a major political candidate threatens the fundamental values of the nation, educators are called to explain the nature of the present threat, that is, to explain one of the oldest problems in Western philosophy, the problem of demagoguery.” (p 38)

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Kinasevych (2016). Time To Learn: Doing Away With Deadlines In Post-Secondary Education.

The assessment of learning was merged with time limits, “a compromise for the sake of administrative efficiency” (Wesman, 1949, p. 51). Deadline performance became a proxy for actual learning, thereby diminishing learner autonomy, motivation, and creativity (Deci & Ryan, 2012).

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