Vowel (2016). Myth-Busting. (Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit issues in Canada.)

“Every single one of us, Indigenous and non-Indigenous alike, has been fed a series of lies, half-truths, and fantasies intended to create a cohesive national identity. What is most startling about this is that a great many people are aware of the errors and omissions present in our system of education and in our public discourse, yet there has not been a national attempt to rectify this.” (p 120)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 6 – Women and Wider Values. (The Culture of Technology.)

“The irony is that where agricultural development is planned by governments, this is usually with the aim of directing more farm produce into the market economy. Such policies result in a degree of economic growth, but achieve this by encouraging male farmers with their cash crops — [page break] groundnuts, coffee, cotton — while usually offering no support at all to the female farmers who grow their families’ food.” (p 99-100)

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Hitchens (2008). Chapter Six: Arguments from Design. (god is not Great: How religion poisons everything.)

“We now know things about our nature that the founders of religion could not even begin to guess at, and that would have stilled their overconfident tongues if they had known of them.” (p 87)

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Hitchens (2008). Chapter Four: A Note on Health, to Which Religion Can Be Hazardous. (god is not Great: How religion poisons everything.)

“The attitude of religion to medicine, like the attitude of religion to [page break] science, is always necessarily problematic and very often necessarily hostile. A modern believer can say and even believe that his faith is quite compatible with science and medicine, but the awkward fact will always be that both things have a tendency to break religion’s monopoly, and have often been fiercely resisted for that reason.” (p 46-47)

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Twenge et al. (2018). Increases in Depressive Symptoms, Suicide-Related Outcomes, and Suicide Rates Among U.S. Adolescents After 2010 and Links to Increased New Media Screen Time.

“Adolescents who spent more time on new media (including social media and electronic devices such as smartphones) were more likely to report mental health issues, and adolescents who spent more time on nonscreen activities (in-person social interaction, sports/exercise, homework, print media, and attending religious services) were less likely.” (p 3)

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Spitzer (2014). Information technology in education: Risks and side effects.

“… we have evidence that humans can learn how to multitask just about as much as they can learn how to fly.” (p 84)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 4 – Beliefs about Resources. (The Culture of Technology.)

“One study group has argued that we have an obligation to future generations to think fifty years ahead, and criticizes most commercial and political planning for its ‘horizon blindness’ beyond about ten years.” (p 67)

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Bowles (2018). The Digital Gap Between Rich and Poor Kids Is Not What We Expected.

“… as Silicon Valley’s parents increasingly panic over the impact screens have on their children and move toward screen-free lifestyles, worries over a new digital divide are rising. It could happen that the children of poorer and middle-class parents will be raised by screens, while the children of Silicon Valley’s elite will be going back to wooden toys and the luxury of human interaction.” (¶4)

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Children’s Screen Time Action Network (2018). Our letter to the APA.

“The great majority of parents have no idea that the social media and video games used by children are developed by psychologists and other experts who use advanced behavior change techniques to pull kids into these platforms and keep them there as long as possible.” (¶13)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 3 – The Culture of Expertise. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Also noteworthy in this episode is the way each professional interprets the problem according to his own specific type of expertise. The chemist studies organic molecules, the automotive engineer redesigns vehicles, and the highway planner looks for ways to reduce congestion.” (p 44)

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