Hitchens (2008). Chapter Four: A Note on Health, to Which Religion Can Be Hazardous. (god is not Great: How religion poisons everything.)

“The attitude of religion to medicine, like the attitude of religion to [page break] science, is always necessarily problematic and very often necessarily hostile. A modern believer can say and even believe that his faith is quite compatible with science and medicine, but the awkward fact will always be that both things have a tendency to break religion’s monopoly, and have often been fiercely resisted for that reason.” (p 46-47)

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Twenge et al. (2018). Increases in Depressive Symptoms, Suicide-Related Outcomes, and Suicide Rates Among U.S. Adolescents After 2010 and Links to Increased New Media Screen Time.

“Adolescents who spent more time on new media (including social media and electronic devices such as smartphones) were more likely to report mental health issues, and adolescents who spent more time on nonscreen activities (in-person social interaction, sports/exercise, homework, print media, and attending religious services) were less likely.” (p 3)

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Children’s Screen Time Action Network (2018). Our letter to the APA.

“The great majority of parents have no idea that the social media and video games used by children are developed by psychologists and other experts who use advanced behavior change techniques to pull kids into these platforms and keep them there as long as possible.” (¶13)

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Vowel (2016). Culture and Identity. (Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit issues in Canada.)

“Listening to, or reading, authentic Indigenous stories means you are accessing different cultures. Please don’t forget that. Sometimes, what you are reading simply will not make sense to you because you lack the cultural context.” (p 98)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 5 (The Real World Of Technology).

“Thus, as more and more of daily life in the real world of technology is conducted via prescriptive technologies, the logic of technology begins to overpower and displace other types of social logic, such as the logic of compassion or the logic of obligation, the logic of ecological survival or the logic of linkages into nature.” (p 92)

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Yosso (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth.

“… his [Bourdieu] theory of cultural capital has been used to assert that some communities are culturally wealthy while others are culturally poor. … In other words, cultural capital is not just inherited or possessed by the middle class, but rather it refers to an accumulation of specific forms of knowledge, skills and abilities that are _valued_ by privileged groups in society.” (p 76)

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MacNell, Driscoll, & Hunt (2014). What’s in a Name: Exposing Gender Bias in Student Ratings of Teaching.

“Our findings show that the bias we saw here is not a result of gendered behavior on the part of the instructors, but of actual bias on the part of the students. Regardless of actual gender or performance, students rated the perceived female instructor significantly more harshly than the perceived male instructor, which suggests that a female instructor would have to work harder than a male to receive comparable ratings.” (p 301)

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Spivak (1988). Can the Subaltern Speak? (Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture)

“Derrida is hard to read; his real object of investigation is classical philosophy. Yet he is less dangerous when understood than the first-world intellectual masquerading as the absent nonrepresenter who lets the oppressed speak for themselves.” (p 292)

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Hargittai & Shafer (2006). Differences in actual and perceived online skills: The role of gender.

Hargittai, E., & Shafer, Steven. (2006). Differences in actual and perceived online skills: The role of gender. Social Science Quarterly, 87(2), 432-448. doi: 10.1111/j.1540-6237.2006.00389.x. “There are a myriad of ways one may use the Internet (e.g., computer-mediated communication manifested by e-mail use or instant messaging; information retrieval that takes advantage of existing material online; content … Read more

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Fletcher & Russell (2001). Incorporating Issues of Sexual Orientation in the Classroom: Challenges and Solutions.

“It has been our experience that although social sanctions prevent students from making inappropriate comments in class concerning race and ethnicity, social class, or religious beliefs, it is perceived by many students to be acceptable to make inappropriate remarks regarding sexual orientation.” (p 36-37)

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