Eamer (2014). E-learning for Endangered Languages: What is the State of the Art?

“… it is only via fluent speakers that dying languages can be inter-generationally transmitted in order to once again become the mother tongues of a new generation.” (p 140)

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Statistics Canada. (2017). The Aboriginal languages of First Nations people, Métis and Inuit census of population, 2016.

“The number of Aboriginal people able to speak an Aboriginal language exceeded the number who reported an Aboriginal mother tongue. This suggests that many people, especially young people, are learning Aboriginal languages as second languages.” (p 1)

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Children’s Screen Time Action Network (2018). Our letter to the APA.

“The great majority of parents have no idea that the social media and video games used by children are developed by psychologists and other experts who use advanced behavior change techniques to pull kids into these platforms and keep them there as long as possible.” (¶13)

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Chambers (2015). Language Nests as an Emergent Global Phenomenon.

“This literature review demonstrates that approaches to language nest program development and delivery are shaped by many factors such as: Indigenous language status within the community, population size, availability of fluent speakers and early childhood educators, state legislation and funding, and access to materials and resources in the target language.” (p 26)

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Everett-Green (2015). How my neighbourhood looks and sounds in Ojibway.

“In another Spreecast, about learning indigenous languages, Coast Salish teacher Khelsilem Rivers, founder of the Skwomesh Language Academy in Squamish, B.C., said he isn’t interested in language apps, CD-ROMs or anything that involves working from English translations. Fluency is impossible with ‘that English brain controlling things.’ Full immersion is the only way, he said…” (¶21)

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Vowel (2016). Culture and Identity. (Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit issues in Canada.)

“Listening to, or reading, authentic Indigenous stories means you are accessing different cultures. Please don’t forget that. Sometimes, what you are reading simply will not make sense to you because you lack the cultural context.” (p 98)

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Clarke (2017). Grounding care practices in theory.

“… the families’ supporters argue for the importance of valuing traditional healing practices as fundamental cultural values that ought to be preserved and respected no matter what Western medicine might favour or predict.” (p 69)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechiseechigemitowin, Strategic Alliances: Connection to the Content. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Having a personal relationship with students meant the teachers were aware of the characteristics and interests of their students and were able to use these to connect students to the curriculum.” (p 167)

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