King (1963). Letter From A Birmingham Jail.

“I have almost reached the regrettable conclusion that the Negro’s great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen’s Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to ‘order’ than to justice; who prefers a negative peace which is the absence of tension to a positive peace which is the presence of justice; who constantly says: ‘I agree with you in the goal you seek, but I cannot agree with your methods of direct action’; who paternalistically believes he can set the timetable for another man’s freedom; who lives by a mythical concept of time and who constantly advises the Negro to wait for a ‘more convenient season.'” (¶23, p 9-10)

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Ellul (1964). Chapter 1 – Techniques. (The Technological Society.)

“Technique has become autonomous; it has fashioned an omnivorous world which obeys its own laws and which has renounced all tradition. Technique no longer rests on tradition, but rather on previous technical procedures; and its evolution is too rapid, too upsetting, to integrate the older traditions.” (p 14)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 6 – Women and Wider Values. (The Culture of Technology.)

“The irony is that where agricultural development is planned by governments, this is usually with the aim of directing more farm produce into the market economy. Such policies result in a degree of economic growth, but achieve this by encouraging male farmers with their cash crops — [page break] groundnuts, coffee, cotton — while usually offering no support at all to the female farmers who grow their families’ food.” (p 99-100)

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Task Force on Aboriginal Languages and Cultures. (2005). Part 4: First Nation, Inuit And Métis Languages: Where We Are Now. (Towards a New Beginning.)

“The vitality of languages may be determined by a number of factors. Two of the most commonly used measures are the number of ‘fluent’ speakers, and the rate at which successive generations learn and speak the language (intergenerational transmission).” (p 33)

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Eamer (2014). E-learning for Endangered Languages: What is the State of the Art?

“… it is only via fluent speakers that dying languages can be inter-generationally transmitted in order to once again become the mother tongues of a new generation.” (p 140)

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Statistics Canada. (2017). The Aboriginal languages of First Nations people, Métis and Inuit census of population, 2016.

“The number of Aboriginal people able to speak an Aboriginal language exceeded the number who reported an Aboriginal mother tongue. This suggests that many people, especially young people, are learning Aboriginal languages as second languages.” (p 1)

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Children’s Screen Time Action Network (2018). Our letter to the APA.

“Persuasive technology is the design[3] of digital devices and apps to influence human thoughts and behavior. While these techniques are used for positive purposes (e.g., more efficient website navigation), they are also employed with the guidance of psychologists and other behavior experts working in the tech industry to persuade users, many of whom are children, to spend long periods of time using social media and video game sites.” (¶4)

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Chambers (2015). Language Nests as an Emergent Global Phenomenon.

“This literature review demonstrates that approaches to language nest program development and delivery are shaped by many factors such as: Indigenous language status within the community, population size, availability of fluent speakers and early childhood educators, state legislation and funding, and access to materials and resources in the target language.” (p 26)

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Everett-Green (2015). How my neighbourhood looks and sounds in Ojibway.

“In another Spreecast, about learning indigenous languages, Coast Salish teacher Khelsilem Rivers, founder of the Skwomesh Language Academy in Squamish, B.C., said he isn’t interested in language apps, CD-ROMs or anything that involves working from English translations. Fluency is impossible with ‘that English brain controlling things.’ Full immersion is the only way, he said…” (¶21)

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Vowel (2016). Culture and Identity. (Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit issues in Canada.)

“Listening to, or reading, authentic Indigenous stories means you are accessing different cultures. Please don’t forget that. Sometimes, what you are reading simply will not make sense to you because you lack the cultural context.” (p 98)

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