Wilson (2008). On the Research Journey. (Research is ceremony: Indigenous research methods.)

“… four dominant paradigms … there is a common thread of thinking that runs through them. This commonality is that knowledge is seen as being _individual_ in nature. This is vastly different from the Indigenous paradigm, where knowledge is seen as belonging to the cosmos of which we are a part and where researchers are only the interpreters of this knowledge. This distinction in the ownership of knowledge is one major difference between the dominant and Indigenous paradigms …” (p 38)

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Wilson (2008). Getting Started. (Research is ceremony: Indigenous research methods.)

“The development of an Indigenous research paradigm is of great importance to Indigenous people because it allows the development of Indigenous theory and methods of practice. For example, in the field of Indigenous psychology, Indigenous people will be the ones who decide what is ‘normal’ or ‘abnormal,’ or if that distinction even needs to exist.” (p 19)

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Yosso (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth.

“… his [Bourdieu] theory of cultural capital has been used to assert that some communities are culturally wealthy while others are culturally poor. … In other words, cultural capital is not just inherited or possessed by the middle class, but rather it refers to an accumulation of specific forms of knowledge, skills and abilities that are _valued_ by privileged groups in society.” (p 76)

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Bennett (2008). The Strategies.

“For the privacy advocate, the politics of information is more difficult. It relies upon argumentation about potential consequences. It often involves extrapolations from the experiences of similar surveillance systems in other times and places. Increasingly it involves considerable technical expertise, and sophisticated understandings of the operation of complex public and private organizations.” (p 98)

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Molnar (2012). Responsibility as the Welcoming of Difference: Thoughts on Levinas and a Teacher’s Experience.

“There are powerful arguments that exist in advocating for educators’ involvement in anti-racist and social justice undertakings, yet at the core of these exists how responsibility is understood and enacted in face-to-face interactions.” (p 46)

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Justice & Stanley (2016). Teaching in the Time of Trump.

“Public schools exist, in part, for the political purpose of instilling the principal values of a democratic republic, training students in the skills and knowledge requisite to healthy democratic life. In a time when a major political candidate threatens the fundamental values of the nation, educators are called to explain the nature of the present threat, that is, to explain one of the oldest problems in Western philosophy, the problem of demagoguery.” (p 38)

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The origin of “dead-lines”

“The horrors of that prison were so great that one man went over the line, and refused to leave it until he was shot dead. So great was the horror and misery of that place that I myself had thoughts of going over that dead-line to be shot in preference to living there.” (p 73)

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Freire (2000). Pedagogy of the oppressed.

“Dehumanization, which marks not only those whose humanity has been stolen, but also (though in a different way) those who have stolen it, is a distortion of the vocation of becoming more fully human.” (p 44)

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