Yosso (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth.

“… his [Bourdieu] theory of cultural capital has been used to assert that some communities are culturally wealthy while others are culturally poor. … In other words, cultural capital is not just inherited or possessed by the middle class, but rather it refers to an accumulation of specific forms of knowledge, skills and abilities that are _valued_ by privileged groups in society.” (p 76)

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Bennett (2008). The Strategies.

“For the privacy advocate, the politics of information is more difficult. It relies upon argumentation about potential consequences. It often involves extrapolations from the experiences of similar surveillance systems in other times and places. Increasingly it involves considerable technical expertise, and sophisticated understandings of the operation of complex public and private organizations.” (p 98)

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Molnar (2012). Responsibility as the Welcoming of Difference: Thoughts on Levinas and a Teacher’s Experience.

“There are powerful arguments that exist in advocating for educators’ involvement in anti-racist and social justice undertakings, yet at the core of these exists how responsibility is understood and enacted in face-to-face interactions.” (p 46)

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Justice & Stanley (2016). Teaching in the Time of Trump.

“Public schools exist, in part, for the political purpose of instilling the principal values of a democratic republic, training students in the skills and knowledge requisite to healthy democratic life. In a time when a major political candidate threatens the fundamental values of the nation, educators are called to explain the nature of the present threat, that is, to explain one of the oldest problems in Western philosophy, the problem of demagoguery.” (p 38)

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