Wilson (2008). Relational Accountability. (Research is ceremony: Indigenous research methods.)

“We start to feel removed from our relationships and relational accountability when we are always having to deal with white academics, the white system of academia and get taken further and further from our community and intuitive way of doing things.” (p 104)

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Wilson (2008). The Elements of an Indigenous Research Paradigm. (Research is ceremony: Indigenous research methods.)

“Just as the components of the paradigm are related, the components themselves all have to do with relationships. The ontology and epistemology are based upon a process of relationships that form a mutual reality. The axiology and methodology are based upon maintaining accountability to these relationships.” (p 70-71)

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Vowel (2016). The Terminology of Relationships. (Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit issues in Canada)

“I mean, it would be a bit off to deliberately keep calling someone ‘Susie’ when she’s asked you to call her ‘Susan,’ right?” (p 8)

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Wilson (2008). On the Research Journey. (Research is ceremony: Indigenous research methods.)

“… four dominant paradigms … there is a common thread of thinking that runs through them. This commonality is that knowledge is seen as being _individual_ in nature. This is vastly different from the Indigenous paradigm, where knowledge is seen as belonging to the cosmos of which we are a part and where researchers are only the interpreters of this knowledge. This distinction in the ownership of knowledge is one major difference between the dominant and Indigenous paradigms …” (p 38)

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Wilson (2008). Getting Started. (Research is ceremony: Indigenous research methods.)

“The development of an Indigenous research paradigm is of great importance to Indigenous people because it allows the development of Indigenous theory and methods of practice. For example, in the field of Indigenous psychology, Indigenous people will be the ones who decide what is ‘normal’ or ‘abnormal,’ or if that distinction even needs to exist.” (p 19)

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Yosso (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth.

“… his [Bourdieu] theory of cultural capital has been used to assert that some communities are culturally wealthy while others are culturally poor. … In other words, cultural capital is not just inherited or possessed by the middle class, but rather it refers to an accumulation of specific forms of knowledge, skills and abilities that are _valued_ by privileged groups in society.” (p 76)

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