Snyder (2017). On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.

“You submit to tyranny when you renounce the difference between what you want to hear and what is actually the case. This renunciation of reality can feel natural and pleasant, but the result is your demise as an individual — and thus the collapse of any political system that depends upon individualism.”

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 6 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… if somebody robs a store, it’s a crime and the state is all set and ready to nab the criminal. But if somebody steals from the commons and from the future, it’s seen as entrepreneurial activity and the state cheers and gives them tax concessions rather than arresting them.” (p 123)

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Merton (1964). Foreword. (The Technological Society.)

“Ours is a progressively technical civilization: by this Ellul means that the ever-expanding and irreversible rule of technique is extended to all domains of life. It is a civilization committed to the quest for continually improved means to carelessly examined ends.” (p vi)

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Kinasevych (2018). Research, Technology and Neocolonialism. [References]

References used in presentation at Graduate Students Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies, 2018.

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Ladefoged (1992). Another View of Endangered Languages.

“The case for studying endangered languages is very strong on linguistic grounds. It is often enormously strong on humanitarian grounds as well. But it would be self-serving of linguists to pretend that this is always the case. … We should always be sensitive to the concerns of the people whose language we are studying. But we should not assume that we know what is best for them.” (p 810)

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Clarke (2017). Grounding care practices in theory: Exploring the potential for the ethics of care to provide theoretical justification for patient-centered care.

“… the families’ supporters argue for the importance of valuing traditional healing practices as fundamental cultural values that ought to be preserved and respected no matter what Western medicine might favour or predict.” (p 69)

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Bohaker & Dirks (2015). Privacy Impact Assessments and Microsoft & Google Vendor Contracts: Examining Canadian University eCommunications Outsourcing decisions.

“To give just one representative example, here is the short explanation given on the University of Manitoba’s ‘Frequently Asked Questions page about their Office 365 email deployment. The question: ‘is my email subject to US government laws? The answer: ‘Yes. However, the move to Office 365 results in no appreciable difference to what currently exists with our email. US and Canadian laws regarding email are very similar in nature.63. In making such claims, we noticed that the authors of PIAs and University ‘FAQ’ documents were drawing on conclusions also reached by some privacy commissioners and asserted by some privacy experts and product vendors. As we have found in our research, this argument is deeply flawed.64 Canadian jurisdiction offers significantly better privacy protection to Canadians and residents than US jurisdiction does, for example.” (p 19)

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Hall (1984). God is in the Details. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“According to Fuentes, our denial of the past has led to the degradation of morality and the denial of the lessons of the past. Denial of the rights as well as the reality of other cultures is another of the consequences of Western time concepts.” (p 201-202)

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Rymhs (2016). Appropriating Guilt: Reconciliation in an Indigenous Canadian Context. (Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures.)

“Guilt, in effect, becomes a dissolute concept, swept into colonial history, attributed to past government policies, or directed at faceless institutions rather than being individually or personally owned. At times bypassing the attribution of responsibility altogether, the process of reconciliation overlooks the logic that asking for forgiveness does not imply the granting of it. The success always implied by the act of reconciliation dissolves the wronged subject’s agency as the public, the government, and its institutions forgive themselves.” (p 327)

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