Fogg (2009). A behavior model for persuasive design.

“The FBM asserts that for a person to perform a target behavior, he or she must (1) be sufficiently motivated, (2) have the ability to perform the behavior, and (3) be triggered to perform the behavior. These three factors must occur at the same moment, else the behavior will not happen.” (p 1)

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Patton, M. A. (2000). The Importance of Being Flexible with Assignment Deadlines.

“This article suggests ways in which course providers, by circumventing traditional academic policies and showing maximum flexibility and understanding to non-traditional students, can bring high-risk students long-term positive results …” (p 417)

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Gomez-Zuebisch (2010). Introduction. (A phenomenological exploration of the learning values derived from instructional short videos among adult learners.)

“To this resistance, Mitra responded with a quote from the science fiction writer Sir Arthur C. Clarke who stated ‘A teacher that can be replaced by a machine should be’.” (p 27)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Breaking Trail: Stories Outside the (Classroom) Box. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Many students have reported that ‘traditional life’ in the wilderness brings a feeling of serenity and peace to one’s heart and spirit” (p 186)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Iseechigehina, Planned Actions: Connection to the Process. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“No single teaching approach was used for every class or by every teacher to effectively connect students to the process of learning. Each teacher used a variety of approaches that included mastery learning, concrete materials, storytelling, one-on-one, the talking or sharing circle, group work, and learning that was experiential, community-based, activity-based, or land-based learning.” (p 148)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weetutoskemitowin, Working Together: Social Systems. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The use of Indigenous language, patterns of communication, and incorporation of Indigenous knowledge and values in the class created a sense of familiarity and belonging, so that students would be open to learning.” (p 122)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechihitowin, Helping and Supporting Relationships: The Foundation. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Trust was also related to setting and enforcing clear expectations and boundaries for performance and behaviour. Students needed to trust that a teacher would be firm in dealing with inappropriate behaviour, impose fair consequences, and follow up.” (p 110)

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Delpit & Dowdy (2002). No Kinda Sense.

“When instruction is stripped of children’s cultural legacies, then they are forced to believe that the world and all the good things in it were created by others. This leaves students further alienated from the school and its instructional goals, and more likely to view themselves as inadequate.” (p 41)

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Kinasevych (2016). Time To Learn: Doing Away With Deadlines In Post-Secondary Education.

The assessment of learning was merged with time limits, “a compromise for the sake of administrative efficiency” (Wesman, 1949, p. 51). Deadline performance became a proxy for actual learning, thereby diminishing learner autonomy, motivation, and creativity (Deci & Ryan, 2012).

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