Selwyn (2011). Making sense of young people, education and digital technology: the role of sociological theory.

“… it often appears a challenge for those academics working in the area of educational technology to think critically about something upon which they are dependent and something by which many of them have become passionately absorbed.” (p 82)

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Oztok (2014). The Hidden Curriculum of Online Learning.

“… online learning environments can reproduce inequitable learning conditions when the context requires certain individuals to assimilate mainstream beliefs and values at the expense of their own identities. Since identifications have certain social and political consequences by enabling or constraining individuals’ access to educational resources, individuals may try to be identified in line with culturally-hegemonic perspectives in order to gain or secure their access to educational resources or to legitimize their learning experiences.” (p ii-iii)

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Leeds (2014). Temporal experiences of e-learning by distance learners.

“For this study e-learning is defined as ‘learning facilitated and supported through the use of information and communications technology’ (JISC, 2012). … it examines the time personalities of individual learners, drawing a distinction between those with a polychronic conception of time who prefer to engage in two or more tasks or events simultaneously and those with a monochronic conception that prefer to concentrate on one activity at a time.” (p 180)

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Jonassen & Reeves (1996). Learning with technology: Using computers as cognitive tools.

“Cognitive tools refer to technologies, tangible or intangible, that enhance the cognitive powers of human beings during thinking, problem solving, and learning. Written language, mathematical notation, and, most recently, the universal computer are examples of cognitive tools.” (p 693)

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Nichols & Allen-Brown (1996). Critical theory and educational technology.

“Critical theorists also suggest that modern social crises, say in education or government, are related to the intrusion of overly rational (scientific, analytical, technological), instrumental, means-ends philosophies that detract from reflection on our ultimate ends — ends related to good and bad, right and wrong. Over time, we have largely abandoned moral perspectives.” (p 228)

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Morgan (2013). Technology Integration in Multicultural Settings. (Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology)

“One of the emerging solutions to this complex challenge is the ability of the latest technologies to allow users enormous control in configuring the ways in which these systems behave and the ways in which learning materials can thus be self-configured to closely match the cultural expectations of the learner.” (p 867)

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Young (2013). The Presence of Culture in Learning. (Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology)

“Studies in science education research argue that Western science education fails to serve the needs of indigenous and marginalized groups due to its (1) epistemological conflicts, (2) irrelevance to lived experiences, (3) domination of Western science and scientific thought (Brayboy & Castagno, 2008) …” (p 355)

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Seaman & Tinti-Kane (2013). Social media for teaching and learning.

“Concerns about privacy, both for themselves and for their students, and about maintaining the class as a private space for free and open discussion, have been at the top of the list of concerns in all of the reports. Until faculty feel that this issue has been addressed, the wide-scale adoption of commercial social media tools in the classroom will remain limited. Concerns about the integrity of student submissions also cast a shadow on the adoption of these tools.” (p 3)

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Friedman (2014). The MOOC Revolution That Wasn’t.

“Only half of those who signed up watched even one lecture, and only 4 percent stayed long enough to complete a course. Further, the audience for MOOCs already had college degrees so the promise of disrupting higher education failed to materialize. The MOOC providers argue that completion of free courses is the wrong measure of success, but even a controlled experiment run by San Jose State with paying students found the courses less effective than their old-school counterparts.”

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