Januszewski & Molenda (2013). Educational Technology: A Definition with Commentary.

“… ‘technological’ is a shorthand term that describes an approach to human activity based on the definition of technology as ‘the systematic application of scientific or other organized knowledge to practical tasks’ (Galbraith, 1967, p. 12).” (p 8)

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Selwyn (2011). Making sense of young people, education and digital technology: the role of sociological theory.

“… it often appears a challenge for those academics working in the area of educational technology to think critically about something upon which they are dependent and something by which many of them have become passionately absorbed.” (p 82)

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Oztok (2014). The Hidden Curriculum of Online Learning.

“… online learning environments can reproduce inequitable learning conditions when the context requires certain individuals to assimilate mainstream beliefs and values at the expense of their own identities. Since identifications have certain social and political consequences by enabling or constraining individuals’ access to educational resources, individuals may try to be identified in line with culturally-hegemonic perspectives in order to gain or secure their access to educational resources or to legitimize their learning experiences.” (p ii-iii)

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Leeds (2014). Temporal experiences of e-learning by distance learners.

“For this study e-learning is defined as ‘learning facilitated and supported through the use of information and communications technology’ (JISC, 2012). … it examines the time personalities of individual learners, drawing a distinction between those with a polychronic conception of time who prefer to engage in two or more tasks or events simultaneously and those with a monochronic conception that prefer to concentrate on one activity at a time.” (p 180)

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Jonassen & Reeves (1996). Learning with technology: Using computers as cognitive tools.

“Cognitive tools refer to technologies, tangible or intangible, that enhance the cognitive powers of human beings during thinking, problem solving, and learning. Written language, mathematical notation, and, most recently, the universal computer are examples of cognitive tools.” (p 693)

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