Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechiseechigemitowin, Strategic Alliances: Connection to the Content. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Having a personal relationship with students meant the teachers were aware of the characteristics and interests of their students and were able to use these to connect students to the curriculum.” (p 167)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weetutoskemitowin, Working Together: Social Systems. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The use of Indigenous language, patterns of communication, and incorporation of Indigenous knowledge and values in the class created a sense of familiarity and belonging, so that students would be open to learning.” (p 122)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Weechihitowin, Helping and Supporting Relationships: The Foundation. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Trust was also related to setting and enforcing clear expectations and boundaries for performance and behaviour. Students needed to trust that a teacher would be firm in dealing with inappropriate behaviour, impose fair consequences, and follow up.” (p 110)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 1 (The Real World Of Technology.)

“It is my conviction that nothing short of a global reformation of major social forces and of the social contract can end this historical period of profound and violent transformations, and give a manner of security to the world and to its citizens. … The viability of technology, like democracy, depends in the end on the practice of justice and on the enforcement of limits to power.” (p 5)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). How to Get There: Conceptualizing Effective Teaching. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The principles of effective teaching for Indigenous students apply to all students, but Indigenous education has unique features based on the history, culture, and philosophies of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples, who tend to view the world in a more holistic way than the European framework that is the basis of our education system in Canada.” (p 78)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). What to Build Upon: Sociocultural Strengths. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The concept is further complicated because, in addition to living beings, it includes life force entities such as toboggans, spears, cars, record players, and so on. These latter entities are considered forms of life, not inanimate objects or things.” (p 56)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Where We’ve Been: Sociohistorical Realities. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The hierarchical structure of education continues to the present with the norms of unequal power relations and competitive individualism that can result in inequities.” (p 44)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Where We Are in Indigenous Education. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“… the late Elder Ken Goodwill from the Standing Buffalo Dakota First Nation said that the purpose of education is to help students recognize who they are, to see their gifts, talents, and strengths and recognize the responsibility that accompanies these gifts, so they can survive, thrive, and contribute as they navigate through both the broader world and Indigenous cultures.” (p 5)

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Smith (2012). Articulating an Indigenous Research Agenda. (Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples.)

“Although our communities have a critical perspective of universities and what they represent, at the same time these same communities want their members to gain Western educations and high-level qualifications. But they do not want this to be achieved at the cost of destroying people’s indigenous identities, their languages, values and practices.” (p 149)

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