Goulet & Goulet (2014). What to Build Upon: Sociocultural Strengths. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The concept is further complicated because, in addition to living beings, it includes life force entities such as toboggans, spears, cars, record players, and so on. These latter entities are considered forms of life, not inanimate objects or things.” (p 56)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Where We’ve Been: Sociohistorical Realities. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“The hierarchical structure of education continues to the present with the norms of unequal power relations and competitive individualism that can result in inequities.” (p 44)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Where We Are in Indigenous Education. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“… the late Elder Ken Goodwill from the Standing Buffalo Dakota First Nation said that the purpose of education is to help students recognize who they are, to see their gifts, talents, and strengths and recognize the responsibility that accompanies these gifts, so they can survive, thrive, and contribute as they navigate through both the broader world and Indigenous cultures.” (p 5)

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Smith (2012). Articulating an Indigenous Research Agenda. (Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples.)

“Although our communities have a critical perspective of universities and what they represent, at the same time these same communities want their members to gain Western educations and high-level qualifications. But they do not want this to be achieved at the cost of destroying people’s indigenous identities, their languages, values and practices.” (p 149)

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Yosso (2005). Whose culture has capital? A critical race theory discussion of community cultural wealth.

“… his [Bourdieu] theory of cultural capital has been used to assert that some communities are culturally wealthy while others are culturally poor. … In other words, cultural capital is not just inherited or possessed by the middle class, but rather it refers to an accumulation of specific forms of knowledge, skills and abilities that are _valued_ by privileged groups in society.” (p 76)

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