Merton (1964). Foreword. (The Technological Society.)

“Ours is a progressively technical civilization: by this Ellul means that the ever-expanding and irreversible rule of technique is extended to all domains of life. It is a civilization committed to the quest for continually improved means to carelessly examined ends.” (p vi)

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Mander (1991). Fantasy And Reality. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“Living constantly inside an environment of our own invention, reacting solely to things we ourselves have created, we are essentially living _inside our own minds_. Where evolution was once an interactive process between human beings and a natural, unmediated world, evolution is now an interaction between human beings and our own artifacts.” (p 32)

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Mander (1991). Growing Up With Technology. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“By our silence we gave our tacit approval. … The parameters of the discussion, even the parameters of thought, were predefined by corporate, governmental, and scientific institutions.” (p 23)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 5 (The Real World Of Technology).

“Thus, as more and more of daily life in the real world of technology is conducted via prescriptive technologies, the logic of technology begins to overpower and displace other types of social logic, such as the logic of compassion or the logic of obligation, the logic of ecological survival or the logic of linkages into nature.” (p 92)

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Tolentino (2017). The Gig Economy Celebrates Working Yourself to Death.

“At the root of this is the American obsession with self-reliance, which makes it more acceptable to applaud an individual for working himself to death than to argue that an individual working himself to death is evidence of a flawed economic system.” (¶ 8)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 3 (The Real World Of Technology.)

“One of the reasons I emphasize the link between public policies related to the provision of infrastructures and the spread of technology is the following: Rarely are there public discussions about the merits or problems of adopting a particular technology. … Regardless of who might own railways or transmission lines, radio [page break] … frequencies or satellites, the public sphere provides the space, the permission, the regulation, and the finances for much of the research. It is the public sphere that grants the ‘right of way.’ It seems to be high time that we, as citizens, become concerned about the granting of such technological rights of way.” (p 64-65)

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Marcuse (1991). The Closing of the Political Universe. (One-Dimensional Man.)

“But with all its truth, the argument cannot answer the time-honored question: who educates the educators, and where is the proof that they are in possession of ‘the good?'” (p 44)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 1 (The Real World Of Technology.)

“It is my conviction that nothing short of a global reformation of major social forces and of the social contract can end this historical period of profound and violent transformations, and give a manner of security to the world and to its citizens. … The viability of technology, like democracy, depends in the end on the practice of justice and on the enforcement of limits to power.” (p 5)

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Marcuse (1991). The New Forms of Control. (One-Dimensional Man.)

“The people recognize themselves in their commodities; they find their soul in their automobile, hi-fi set, split-level home, kitchen equipment. The very mechanism which ties the individual to his society has changed, and social control is anchored in the new needs which it has produced.” (p 11)

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