Spivak (1988). Can the Subaltern Speak? (Marxism and the Interpretation of Culture)

“Derrida is hard to read; his real object of investigation is classical philosophy. Yet he is less dangerous when understood than the first-world intellectual masquerading as the absent nonrepresenter who lets the oppressed speak for themselves.” (p 292)

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Johnson (1978). In search of the affluent society.

“The increase of consumption time at the expense of free time is both a loss and a gain. Here we encounter a subtle, complex problem. Increased consumption may add excitement and pleasure to what would otherwise be considered boring time. On the other hand, this increase has the effect of crowding time with consumption activities so that people begin to feel that ‘time is short’ — which may detract from the enjoyment of consumption.” (p 203)

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Baptiste (2001). Educating lone wolves: Pedagogical implications of human capital theory.

“Human capital theorists treat people as _homo economica_: radically isolated, pleasure-seeking materialists who are born free of social constraints or responsibility, who possess no intrinsic sociability, and who are driven, ultimately, by the desire for material happiness and bodily security. They assume that these desires are fundamentally the same for all people across space and time (stable preferences), and they believe that each individual will at all times attempt to maximally fulfill those hedonistic desires (maximizing behavior).” (p 195)

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