Snyder (2017). On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century.

“You submit to tyranny when you renounce the difference between what you want to hear and what is actually the case. This renunciation of reality can feel natural and pleasant, but the result is your demise as an individual — and thus the collapse of any political system that depends upon individualism.”

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 6 (The Real World Of Technology).

“… if somebody robs a store, it’s a crime and the state is all set and ready to nab the criminal. But if somebody steals from the commons and from the future, it’s seen as entrepreneurial activity and the state cheers and gives them tax concessions rather than arresting them.” (p 123)

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Mander (1991). Growing Up With Technology. (In the absence of the sacred.)

“By our silence we gave our tacit approval. … The parameters of the discussion, even the parameters of thought, were predefined by corporate, governmental, and scientific institutions.” (p 23)

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Snyder (2018). Cybercolony USA.

“And that’s what I mean, by the way, by being cyber-colonized. That things that are happening out in a world where no one cares about you are, in fact, affecting the things that you care about and the people that you care about.”

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 4 (The Real World Of Technology).

“Many technological systems, when examined for context and overall design, are basically anti-people. … When students are seen as not sufficiently competent, it is likely to be computers that the school purchases rather than extra teacher’s time and extra human help. And when security agencies in this country feel that Canadian citizens harbour thoughts and might contemplate actions that the state doesn’t like, they don’t invite these citizens to discuss their grievances or alternate thoughts openly and on a basis of equality. Instead, telephones are tapped or files are assembled by purely technological means.” (p 71-72)

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Canadian Press. (2018). Can U.S. border guards search your phone? Yes, and here are some details on how.

“Agents can demand a password to open your phone, without probable cause, Nielsen confirmed during the hearing. However, Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) staff attorney Sophia Cope says the directive, which she calls confusing, also allows you to refuse to do so. That, of course, is not without its consequences she says in a statement to CBC News. Your device could be seized or detained. The border agent could delay your travel or even deny entry if you are not a U.S. citizen.” (¶ 9)

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Logue (2016). Trump used as taunt against students and minority groups.

“Students take their cues for how to act from what they see happening out in the world, and ‘as [these incidents are] increasingly part of the national scene, I suspect we’ll see more of this,’ Ervin said. ‘College campuses are incubators of citizens of tomorrow, and they’ll take part in what they think is the political process.'” (¶ 15)

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Russell (2009). The Functions Of A Teacher. (Unpopular Essays.)

“In our more highly organised world we face a new problem. Something called education is given to everybody, usually by the State, but sometimes by the Churches. The teacher has thus become, in the vast majority of cases, a civil servant obliged to carry out the behests of men who have not his learning, who have no experience of dealing with the young, and whose only attitude towards education is that of the propagandist.” (p 110)

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Franklin (2004). Chapter 3 (The Real World Of Technology.)

“One of the reasons I emphasize the link between public policies related to the provision of infrastructures and the spread of technology is the following: Rarely are there public discussions about the merits or problems of adopting a particular technology. … Regardless of who might own railways or transmission lines, radio [page break] … frequencies or satellites, the public sphere provides the space, the permission, the regulation, and the finances for much of the research. It is the public sphere that grants the ‘right of way.’ It seems to be high time that we, as citizens, become concerned about the granting of such technological rights of way.” (p 64-65)

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Marcuse (1991). The Closing of the Political Universe. (One-Dimensional Man.)

“But with all its truth, the argument cannot answer the time-honored question: who educates the educators, and where is the proof that they are in possession of ‘the good?'” (p 44)

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