Kemper (2016). Cultural Hybridity, Resilience and the Communication of Contemporary Cherokee Culture through Mobile Technologies. (Indigenous People and Mobile Technologies.)

“Since adaptability is inevitable, the original culture makes the best of things, as we will see in the example of the Cherokee and mobile technologies.” (p 243)

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Hall (1984). Glossary. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

Enculturation. The process of learning a culture is called enculturation. The enculturation process usually progresses in stages; six-year-olds are more enculturated than three-year-olds, teenagers have almost completed the process and in many cases are under the impression that they have, which can be a source of tension between them and fully enculturated individuals.” (p 229)

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Hall (1984). Appendix II – Japanese and American Contrasts, with Special Reference to the MA. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“The closest one can come to understanding Japanese time is to approach via the route of MA. MA is time-space. … in the West we pay particular attention to the arrangement of objects, and in Japan it is the arrangement of the spaces — the intervals, MA — that are attended. In speech this means that it is the silences between words that also carry meaning and are significant.” (p 208)

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Hall (1984). God is in the Details. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“According to Fuentes, our denial of the past has led to the degradation of morality and the denial of the lessons of the past. Denial of the rights as well as the reality of other cultures is another of the consequences of Western time concepts.” (p 201-202)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Breaking Trail: Stories Outside the (Classroom) Box. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“Many students have reported that ‘traditional life’ in the wilderness brings a feeling of serenity and peace to one’s heart and spirit” (p 186)

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Hall (1984). Entrainment. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“Viewed in the context of human behavior, time is organization. However, Condon’s insights include much more. For example, the definition of the self is deeply embedded in the rhythmic synchronic process. This is because rhythm is inherent in organization, and therefore has a basic design function in the organization of the personality.” (p 180)

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Hall (1984). The Dance of Life. (The dance of life: The other dimension of time.)

“One clue is that the Japanese are more aware of synchrony than the average Westerner. Those tremendous Sumo wrestlers, for example, must synchronize their breathing before the referee will allow the match to begin, and the audience is fully aware of what is happening. In this same vein, Japanese who are conversing will frequently monitor their own breathing in order to stay in sync with their interlocutor!” (p 164)

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Goulet & Goulet (2014). Ininee mamitoneneetumowin, Indigenous Thinking: Emerging Theory of Indigenous Education. (Teaching Each Other: Nehinuw Concepts and Indigenous Pedagogies.)

“However, one of the contradictions of schooling is while it can be an institution of colonization, it also has the potential to decolonize (Smith 2000) and support the development of self-determination for Indigenous students and their communities.” (p 200)

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Youngblood Henderson (2016). Postcolonial Ghost Dancing: Diagnosing European Colonialism. (Learn, Teach, Challenge: Approaching Indigenous Literatures.)

“These colonialists saw themselves as continuing the work of the great seventeenth-century European thinkers who created the idea of an artificial society. In remote places, they constructed colonialism on their heritage of Eurocentrism, universality, and a strategy of difference. In the process, they either rejected or overlooked the Crown’s vision of treaty commonwealth in international law.” (p 169)

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Boroditsky (2005). Linguistic Relativity. (Encyclopedia of cognitive science.)

“In recent years, research on linguistic relativity has enjoyed a considerable resurgence, and much new evidence regarding the effects of language on thought has become available. This chapter reviews several lines of evidence regarding the effects of language on people’s representations of space, time, substances, and objects.” (¶ 4)

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