Selwyn (2016). Minding our language: why education and technology is full of bullshit… and what might be done about it.

“Perhaps, we need a language of education and technology that unpacks more aptly the underlying functions of these technologies and exposes their political intent.” (p 441-442)

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Sinclair (2017). Indigenous nationhood can save the world. Here’s how.

“In political events we take time as Anishinaabeg to greet everyone and make sure we know where everyone is from, who they represent and how, and how their responsibilities have brought them to this place.” (¶17)

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Bachmann (2017). Just in case you meet an alien: Here’s where to learn Klingon.

“Even though the Klingon race is fictional, the spoken language — invented in 1984 by American linguist Marc Okrand — is now being taught at Migros Club School, Switzerland’s largest adult education institution.” (¶2)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 6 – Women and Wider Values. (The Culture of Technology.)

“The irony is that where agricultural development is planned by governments, this is usually with the aim of directing more farm produce into the market economy. Such policies result in a degree of economic growth, but achieve this by encouraging male farmers with their cash crops — [page break] groundnuts, coffee, cotton — while usually offering no support at all to the female farmers who grow their families’ food.” (p 99-100)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 5 – Imperatives and Creative Culture. (The Culture of Technology.)

“Dickson notes that heavy industry had ‘an almost mystical significance’ in the early years of the Russian revolution, and comments that the ‘significance attached to technology’ under these circumstances often ‘disguises the exploitative and alienating role technology plays’ within industrial societies.” (p 93)

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Pacey (1983). Chapter 4 – Beliefs about Resources. (The Culture of Technology.)

“One study group has argued that we have an obligation to future generations to think fifty years ahead, and criticizes most commercial and political planning for its ‘horizon blindness’ beyond about ten years.” (p 67)

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Fogg (2009). A behavior model for persuasive design.

“The FBM asserts that for a person to perform a target behavior, he or she must (1) be sufficiently motivated, (2) have the ability to perform the behavior, and (3) be triggered to perform the behavior. These three factors must occur at the same moment, else the behavior will not happen.” (p 1)

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Bowles (2018). The Digital Gap Between Rich and Poor Kids Is Not What We Expected.

“… as Silicon Valley’s parents increasingly panic over the impact screens have on their children and move toward screen-free lifestyles, worries over a new digital divide are rising. It could happen that the children of poorer and middle-class parents will be raised by screens, while the children of Silicon Valley’s elite will be going back to wooden toys and the luxury of human interaction.” (¶4)

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Children’s Screen Time Action Network (2018). Our letter to the APA.

“Persuasive technology is the design[3] of digital devices and apps to influence human thoughts and behavior. While these techniques are used for positive purposes (e.g., more efficient website navigation), they are also employed with the guidance of psychologists and other behavior experts working in the tech industry to persuade users, many of whom are children, to spend long periods of time using social media and video game sites.” (¶4)

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